Tag Archives: SLM

CARS Response Energy Tour Releases 2019 Season Schedule

Mooresville, NC —The 2019 calendar year will mark the fifth anniversary for the CARS Tour, and its second season with tour title sponsor Response Energy Drink on board. Over the four previous seasons the CARS Tour has hosted 85 different races between both the Super Late Model and Late Model Stock divisions.

Throughout those events, 353 different drivers have made a start in CARS Tour competition, with over $2.1 million dollars in purse money being paid out during that period.

With the 2018 season championships still to be decided for both the Late Model Stock and the Super Late Model divisions at South Boston Speedway on November 3rd, the tour is proud to announce the 2019 season schedule.

The schedule consists of 11 points races and 1 non-points race for Late Model Stock Cars and 8 championship points races for Super Late Models. The CARS Response Energy Tour will once again host events in North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee. For the first time in series history the tour will not visit the Palmetto State, however, the series will make much anticipated returns to familiar tracks in Southern National, Motor Mile, and Dominion Raceway. Another stellar edition to the tour, will be the series debut at Langley Speedway in Hampton, Virginia, to go along with the previously announced non-points Late Model Stock Car race on the Dominion Raceway two mile road course.

“We are proud of this schedule and we are happy to get it out early so our competitors, fans, and our partner tracks can plan appropriately for the 2019 season. While we are sad to see awesome events at tracks like Wake County and Myrtle Beach go away, there’s no doubt that they’ll be back with the CARS Tour in the future. We’ve always made it a priority to mix things up on our schedule to prevent it from becoming stale,” explained CARS Tour Series Director, Chris Ragle. “With that said I think we have great 2019 schedule at some phenomenal facilities.

With the return of the Touring 12 program, the $500 bonus for running three races in a row, The Old North State Nationals for Late Model Stocks, 40% of the Super Late Model races paying $10,000 to win, two co-sanctioned Super Late Model events, and the 3rd Annual Mid Atlantic Classic we should have a great fifth anniversary season ahead of us.”

For additional information on the CARS Response Energy Late Model Stock Tour and the CARS Response Energy Super Late Model Tour visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

2019 Late Model Stock Car Schedule Highlights

-2019 season opener at Southern National Motorsports Park increased overall purse and paying $10,000 to the winner

-Inaugural “Old North State Nationals” at Orange County Speedway April 6-7, 2019 will be the largest paying LMSC race in history with a minimum of $30,000 going to the winner and a minimum of $1,250 awarded to start the six tire feature event. An announcement of a “Stimulus Program” for competitors to pay for their race expense via supporters and grow the race purse leading up to the event will be announced in the coming weeks.

-CARS Late Model Stock Car Tour debut at the beautiful Langley Speedway in Hampton, Virginia on June 8.

-The third annual Throwback 276 at Hickory Motor Speedway continues on its traditional date of August 3rd.

-For the third consecutive season the 2019 LMSC champion will be crowned at South Boston Speedway.

2019 Super Late Model Schedule Highlights

-2019 season opener at Southern National Motorsports Park paying $10,000 to the winner.

-The co-sanctioned race between the CARS Tour, Southern Super Series, and CRA at the Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, Tennessee moves to May 4th.

-The 3rd Annual Mid Atlantic Classic at Orange County Speedway, that will once again pay $10,000 to win and an overall increased purse, moves to August 24th.

-The third annual Throwback 276 at Hickory Motor Speedway continues on its traditional date of August 3rd.

-The return of Super Late Models to the ultra-fast and beautiful Motor Mile Speedway in Radford, Virginia happens on May 18th. This will be the first time SLM have graced the track since the 2015 inaugural season.

-Nearly 40% of the Super Late Model scheduled races in 2019 will pay $10,000 to win.

2019 CARS Response Energy Tour Schedule

March 9 Southern National Motorsport Park – Kenly, NC SLM-$10,000/LMSC-$10,000

March 23 Hickory Motor Speedway – Hickory, NC SLM/LMSC

April 6-7 Orange County Speedway (Old North State Nationals) – Rougemont, NC LMSC-$30,000

May 3 Ace Speedway – Elon, NC LMSC

May 4 Fairgrounds Speedway – Nashville, TN SLM*

May 18 Motor Mile Speedway – Radford, VA SLM/LMSC

June 1 TBA SLM*

June 8 Langley Speedway – Hampton, VA LMSC

June 22 Dominion Raceway – Thornburg, VA LMSC

July 13 Carteret County Speedway – Swansboro, NC LMSC

August 2-3 Hickory Motor Speedway (Throwback 276) – Hickory, NC SLM/LMSC

August 24 Orange County Speedway (Mid Atlantic Classic) – Rougemont, NC SLM-$10,000/LMSC

Nov. 2 South Boston Speedway – South Boston, VA SLM/LMSC

Nov. 16 Dominion Raceway Road Course – Thornburg, VA LMSC**

*Co-sanctioned race with CRA, SSS, and CARS Tour

**Non-points race

***Additional $10,000 to win SLM race at already schedule event TBD

Myrtle Beach CARS Tour Victory Super Sweet For Fultz and Walker

Photo: CARS Tour Press Release

MOORESVILLE, NC – It really isn’t a dream for Chris Walker. The long-time car owner in late model and ProCup circles is still pinching himself every morning since his team picked up their first win in the BakerDist.com 200 at Myrtle Beach Speedway on Saturday, the opening super late model race of the season for the CARS Response Energy Tour.

“This morning when I woke up, the check and the trophy are sitting on my fireplace mantle, but it still hasn’t sunk in,” Walker admitted. “That first one, it’s hard to top it.”

For many outside of the team’s inner circle, it was hard to believe the race was his first win in nearly a decade of car ownership. Most team owners who have had the litany of drivers in their machines as Walker has routinely are associated with winning. And though he had been close, it never happened before. “I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve

“I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve won, and to be a winning owner for the first time, I don’t think you’ll ever top that. It means the world to me. Me and Fultz hung out last night, and he’s won a ton of races, but I think he sees in me how excited I am.”The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz

The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz mingle with away from the track. Yes, their careers are involved in professional motorsports positions during any other weekend, but the schedules lined up to create the crew they used this past weekend. “The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”

“The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends.

During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends. When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.

When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.”It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”

“It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70

After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70 break for tires.”I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”

“I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.

Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.”I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure

“I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure], but didn’t know what it would do when they built up some heat. When we jacked up the left side and Weeder said the left rear still had the centerline in it, then I knew he knew he’d been saving. When we knew that, I knew we had a pretty good piece, all we did was put some tape on the grille and cleaned it. I knew then it was good to go, I just didn’t know if he was going to stretch it out or if there was going to be a lot of cautions or if Raphael or Craig were going to come flying back up. You didn’t know who had rode because the pace was really, really slow.”Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.

Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.”I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”

“I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.

Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.”There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the

“There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the start finish line and it looked like he got a good run. He raced me clean, but if I was racing someone else I would’ve been a little bit more nervous they would’ve run into the back of me or something like that.”Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.

Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.”That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.”

“That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.””You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”

“You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.

And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.”I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care

“I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care to. I would rather put him in it, or if we can rent it, because there’s no more house cars at Fury, that’s fine. If we can go play and have fun, like this one because it all worked out, that’s fine too. We’re all good friends off the track, go out to eat together, hang out, call, whether racing or not. I think the knowledge is what got us there. Without our core guys, sure, it was a fluke win, but with Fultz, Fritz, Mike Darne, Weeder — everyone together put us there.”I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It

“I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It kinda, sorta has, but not yet.” While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the

While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the comraderie of their buddies. Although he and Fultz have been friends for years, it was an otherwise casual conversation which lit the fire for what has already been a successful partnership.”He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

“He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

For more information on Walker Motorsports, visit their website at ChrisWalkerMotorsports.com, follow them on Facebook (@ChrisWalkerMotorsportsInc), Twitter (@CWMTeam), and Instagram (@WalkerMotorsports).

Driver Jeff Fultz can also be found on various social media including Facebook (@JeffFultzRacing), Twitter (@JeffFultz) and Instagram (@JeffFultz).

Racing Roulette Expanded to Super Late Models and Limiteds for Thanksgiving Classic

LUCAMA, NC – Southern National Motorsports Park has expanded the Racing Roulette format, which was implemented for the Late Model Stock Car portion of the Thanksgiving Classic, to the Super Late Model and Limited Late Model divisions.

The Racing Roulette format allows drivers to race for more money to win the race if they pay a higher entry fee.

“We had such great feedback from the Late Model racers and so many questions from Super Late Model and Limited drivers that we thought it’d be great to include all of them,” track owner Michael Diaz saif. “It’s a great concept that the drivers and teams are excited about and we’re excited about the excitement it’s bringing to the Thanksgiving Classic.”

For the Super Late Model feature, which will be run on Sunday, November 26th, drivers can race for $10,000-to-win if they pay a $500 entry fee or $4,000-to-win if they pay a $125 entry fee.

In the Limited Late Model feature, which commences on Saturday, November 25th, drivers can pay a $300 entry fee to race for $4,000-to-win or a $100 entry fee for $2,200-to-win.

Registration for the Thanksgiving Classic is open and competitors can register for the race online.

The Limited Late Model feature on Saturday, November 25th is a 75 lap race.  The Super Late Model portion of the Thanksgiving Classic on Sunday, November 26th will be a 125-lap event.

In addition to Saturday’s Limited Late Model race, the Thanksgiving Classic will also feature a Limited Late Model “Dash for Cash” race on Friday, November 24th.  The 40-lap race, will be a scuff tire.  Drivers competing in the race can bring two tires with them and purchase two tires from the .  The Dash for Cash pays $750 to the winner and $50 to start.

More information about the 17th Thanksgiving Classic presented by Solid Rock Carriers » http://snmpark.com/thanksgivingclassic

For more information about Southern National Motorsports Park, check out SNMP’s website at www.snmpark.com“like” Southern National Motorsports Park on Facebook or “follow” @SNM_Park on Twitter.

Big Money Ahead for CARS Tour in Inaugural “Mid Atlantic Classic” at Orange County Speedway

Photo: CARS Tour Website

The 2017 Puryear Tank Lines/Thrifty Tire Service Centers 300 at Orange County Speedway saw Kyle Busch Motorsports development driver Cole Rouse hold off Matt Craig to claim his first career victory in CARS Super Late Model competition. Local favorite Layne Riggs led wire to wire in the Late Model Stock Car Tour event en route to a popular victory in front of his home crowd.

Riggs’ victory allowed him to slightly extend his points lead over Anthony Alfredo in the LMSC Tour, while Rouse was able to tie Brandon Setzer for the points lead in the SLM Tour. However, when the CARS Tour competitors return to Orange County, there will be more than just points on the line.

The historic, 3/8 mile asphalt oval will play host to the inaugural Mid-Atlantic Classic on July 22, 2017. The 150-lap super late model event will feature several key differences from the previous outing at Orange County for the super late models, including a total purse of $50,875, in which every competitor who makes the 30-car starting grid will earn $1,000. The winner of the Mid-Atlantic Classic will receive $10,000, which is a paycheck that exceeds every previous event in CARS Tour history, including the U.S. Nationals at Bristol that saw race winner Darrell Wallace Jr. earned $7,500.

“We are so excited to be able to bring the best Super Late Model drivers in the country to Orange County Speedway,” said CARS Tour Director of Marketing and Operations Chris Ragle. “Each race at Orange County has gotten bigger than the previous, now with $10,000 to win and $1000 to start we have seen interest beyond our expectations.  It is going to be a great show that you won’t want to miss!”

The Mid-Atlantic Classic will also mark the first time that stage race is used in the CARS Tour. The super late model race will be divided into four segments consisting of 35 laps, 65 laps, another 35 laps and a 15-lap sprint to the finish to end the race. There will be a five-minute break to accompany the end of each stage, and all segment winners will earn a $500 cash bonus, and will start inside the Top 8 for the final stage.

Stage racing has been around in many forms in auto racing over the past several decades, including exhibition NASCAR races such as the All-Star Race and The Clash, as well as the Eldora Dirt Derby in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. However, 2017 is the first year in which stage racing has been utilized throughout the entire NASCAR season, as the Top 10 drivers in each stage receive points, and stage winners in the top three NASCAR series earn a playoff point for their respective Chase. The new format has been well received by drivers and fans in NASCAR, and many CARS Tour competitors believe that stage racing will have many benefits for the series.

“Stage racing is going to be very fan-friendly,” said CARS Super Late Model competitor Bradley McCaskill. “The format is going to give fans something to watch, instead of drivers just riding around and saving tires until the end. It’s kind of cool how the series is giving drivers an incentive to go hard and get track position for later in the race.”

Each segment break will allow teams to change tires and work on their cars. After each break concludes, drivers will line up based on how many tires they changed in the pit box, with drivers who changed no tires starting first, while drivers who changed all four tires will start in the rear of the field. This will only be the second time this season that teams have had the option to make adjustments to their cars during the race, and many of the drivers believe that pit strategy will determine the outcome of the race.

“Everybody is going to want tires, especially as the race gets closer to the end,” said three-time CARS SLM Tour winner Matt Craig. “However, if you can get track position early and get that first stage win, then that will help your starting position. There is a lot to think about, but I think it is going to be a really interesting event, and I think you’ll see some newcomers show up. Pit strategy is really going to help out the guys who normally don’t have a shot to win the race.”

A strong field of super late model teams is expected for the Mid-Atlantic Classic, including CARS SLM Tour points leader Brandon Setzer, Raphael Lessard, Bubba Pollard, Jared Irvan, and local driver Tate Fogleman just to name a few. Although there will not be a $10,000 paycheck or any stage racing for the CARS LMSC Tour, the Mid-Atlantic Classic will serve as another chapter in the close points battle between Layne Riggs, Anthony Alfredo and Josh Berry. Nine points only separate them, but the JR Motorsports teammates of Berry and Alfredo will have to find a way to prevent Riggs from obtaining another win at his home track if they hope to gain an advantage over him.

For more information on the CARS Tour, visit their website at carsracingtour.com. Fresh content and updates can also be found on the series Facebook page (@carstour), Twitter (@carstour), Instagram (@cars_tour), Snapchat (@carstour) and YouTube channel (/carstour). The series Roku app is also available for installation to see live and on-demand events by following the instructions available at www.carstour.tv.

Southern National PASS South Event Cancelled Due To Excessive Heat And Thunderstorms

CHARLOTTE, NC – Pro All Stars Series (PASS) officials announced today that Saturday night’s Southern National 150 for the PASS South Super Late Models at Southern National Motorsports Park has been cancelled due to extreme heat and expected strong thunderstorms.   With temperatures expected to be in the high 90s this weekend and a forecast predicting a 70 percent chance of strong thunderstorms on Saturday, the decision was made to cancel the Southern National event now to save teams and fans money that might be incurred for travel.  PASS will evaluate schedules to see if the event can be made up at a later date.

The next PASS South Super Late Model event will be at South Boston Speedway on Saturday, August 12th.  Entry forms for PASS races at Star Speedway and Oxford Plains Speedway are currently posted at ProAllStarsSeries.com.

 

About the PASS

The Pro All Stars Series is recognized as North America’s premier sanctioning body for asphalt Super Late Models and boasts such marquee events as the Oxford 250 at Oxford Plains Speedway and PASS South’s Easter Bunny 150 and Mason-Dixon MegaMeltdown 300 at the historic Hickory Motor Speedway.  For technical information concerning all PASS divisions please send questions to passracing@roadrunner.com.  For media or marketing questions, please contact Alan Dietz at 704-231-2039 or alandietzpass@live.com.  And, don’t forget to “Like” the Pro All Stars Series on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @PASSSLM14 to keep up with breaking news as it happens.

CARS Tour Announces Road to Bristol Lock in Races at Dominion and Hickory

Cars Pro SeriesMooresville, NC – The Road to Bristol for the CARS Tour will go through two tracks on the 2017 schedule leading up to the Inaugural U.S. Nationals of Short Track Racing at Bristol Motor Speedway on May 19-21, 2017. First, the event at Dominion Raceway on March 25th will give one Super Late Model driver a chance to leave the ultra-fast Virginia track with a top 29 starting position at Bristol in May. Following Dominion, Late Model Stock drivers will get their shot at a top 26 provisional starting spot in Thunder Valley when the tour visits Hickory Motor Speedway on May 6th.

Each of the lock in events are compromised of the new Duel format races and will feature single-car qualifying at each event, with lap one of record-setting the starting field of race one, and lap two of qualifying setting the starting lineup for race two. The driver who has the highest average overall finishing position between the two races will be awarded the Bristol provisional. If a tie occurs with multiple drivers scoring the same average finish, a tie breaker will revert to qualifying results.

“These lock in races play perfectly into our new duel format races. The duel format races with the highest average finisher earning the Bristol provisional, without question opens the door to more competitors having an opportunity to win that golden ticket for the U.S. Nationals in May,” stated CARS Tour Series Director, Chris Ragle. “There’s very much an opportunity for a driver to finish fourth in both races, for example, and earn a starting spot for Bristol. The door is wide open to everyone this way and that’s something we really like and the competitors should too.”

As part of the continued education process of these formats as well as the major events at Bristol, Anderson, and the new Mid-Atlantic Classic on the 2017 schedule, the CARS Tour will host two Facebook Live question and answer sessions open to fans, drivers, owners, and sponsors. The first one will be Monday, January 23rd at 8pm, followed by another one on Wednesday, February 8th at 8pm. These two sessions will lead up to the 3rd Annual CARS Tour Media Night at SRI Performance in Mooresville, NC on Wednesday, March 1st at 7pm.

All 2017 forms for the upcoming season including rulebooks, owner/driver registration forms, annual race entry, and the hard card application have been released on the CARS Tour website atwww.carsracingtour.com.

For more information on the CARS Late Model Stock Tour and the CARS Super Late Model Tour visitwww.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram car_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

Christian Eckes Wins From the Pole at Southern National; Carries Momentum Into Snowball Derby

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Lucama, NC – Two weekends and two victories for the Middletown, New York native Christian Eckes. After a thrilling victory over JRM teammate Josh Berry in the Late Model Stock portion of the Myrtle Beach 400, Eckes entered the 2016 Thanksgiving Classic with his Super Late Model

Eckes was the only car in the twelve-car field to lay down a sub 14-second lap to claim the pole Saturday afternoon. That speed clearly transferred into Sunday’s race as Christian set the pace early in the 125-lap feature. Colt James, the red number fifteen in the field was the only car able to really give him a run for his money and keep him honest. Some decent racing took place behind the two but it was clear Eckes and James were the class of the field.

The race was only slowed by two cautions. First, we had an issue with a car on the backstretch. This gave Colt James the shot he needed to get around Eckes and set the pace he wanted to run. The second caution, however, was the #15 of Colt James who lost power and coasted on the racing surface. James was able to get his car down pit road and had to nose his machine into his pit stall.

This gave the control of the race back to Christian Eckes, which was the final nail in the coffin. Have to tip our hat to Jake Crum who gave it all he had on the final restart but just didn’t have enough under him, Eckes was able to drive away from the field to earn his first Super Late Model victory.

“We had a really good car this weekend,”Eckes when we caught up with him in victory lane. “We unloaded really strong and stayed that way. I got a little worried there when Colt passed me, really just sucks for him to have a mechanical issue he had a really good car. I am just really happy for all my guys, we worked really hard for this race and it paid off, I am just really thankful to be here.”

Coming off the victory at Myrtle Beach and now Southern National, Eckes is heading into the Snowball Derby next weekend with two consecutive victories and momentum on his side. “We built a brand new car for the derby so we should have a good shot,” Eckes explained. “The momentum is going to be big for me. This is my first victory in the super, we have just had so much bad luck this year it’s not even funny. To win last week and this week it’s a big sigh of relief you know. Both wins are huge for me and it will pay off heading into the derby.”

 

UNOFFICIAL Accent Imaging SLM Results

1) #15 Christian Eckes; 125
2) #57 Austin Theriault; 125
3) #8 Tate Folgeman; 125
4) #01 Jake Crum; 125
5) #67 Clay Jones; 125
6) #55 Kevin Floars; 125
7) #25 Michael Faulk; 125
8) #25 Anthony Alfredo; 125
9) #98 Jody Meesmer; 117
10) #15 Colt James; 94 – Engine
11) #7 Tyler Church; 84 – Mechanical
12) #17 Darren Shaw; DNS

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