Tag Archives: Myrtle Beach Speedway

Myrtle Beach CARS Tour Victory Super Sweet For Fultz and Walker

Photo: CARS Tour Press Release

MOORESVILLE, NC – It really isn’t a dream for Chris Walker. The long-time car owner in late model and ProCup circles is still pinching himself every morning since his team picked up their first win in the BakerDist.com 200 at Myrtle Beach Speedway on Saturday, the opening super late model race of the season for the CARS Response Energy Tour.

“This morning when I woke up, the check and the trophy are sitting on my fireplace mantle, but it still hasn’t sunk in,” Walker admitted. “That first one, it’s hard to top it.”

For many outside of the team’s inner circle, it was hard to believe the race was his first win in nearly a decade of car ownership. Most team owners who have had the litany of drivers in their machines as Walker has routinely are associated with winning. And though he had been close, it never happened before. “I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve

“I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve won, and to be a winning owner for the first time, I don’t think you’ll ever top that. It means the world to me. Me and Fultz hung out last night, and he’s won a ton of races, but I think he sees in me how excited I am.”The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz

The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz mingle with away from the track. Yes, their careers are involved in professional motorsports positions during any other weekend, but the schedules lined up to create the crew they used this past weekend. “The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”

“The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends.

During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends. When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.

When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.”It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”

“It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70

After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70 break for tires.”I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”

“I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.

Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.”I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure

“I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure], but didn’t know what it would do when they built up some heat. When we jacked up the left side and Weeder said the left rear still had the centerline in it, then I knew he knew he’d been saving. When we knew that, I knew we had a pretty good piece, all we did was put some tape on the grille and cleaned it. I knew then it was good to go, I just didn’t know if he was going to stretch it out or if there was going to be a lot of cautions or if Raphael or Craig were going to come flying back up. You didn’t know who had rode because the pace was really, really slow.”Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.

Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.”I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”

“I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.

Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.”There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the

“There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the start finish line and it looked like he got a good run. He raced me clean, but if I was racing someone else I would’ve been a little bit more nervous they would’ve run into the back of me or something like that.”Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.

Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.”That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.”

“That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.””You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”

“You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.

And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.”I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care

“I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care to. I would rather put him in it, or if we can rent it, because there’s no more house cars at Fury, that’s fine. If we can go play and have fun, like this one because it all worked out, that’s fine too. We’re all good friends off the track, go out to eat together, hang out, call, whether racing or not. I think the knowledge is what got us there. Without our core guys, sure, it was a fluke win, but with Fultz, Fritz, Mike Darne, Weeder — everyone together put us there.”I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It

“I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It kinda, sorta has, but not yet.” While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the

While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the comraderie of their buddies. Although he and Fultz have been friends for years, it was an otherwise casual conversation which lit the fire for what has already been a successful partnership.”He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

“He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

For more information on Walker Motorsports, visit their website at ChrisWalkerMotorsports.com, follow them on Facebook (@ChrisWalkerMotorsportsInc), Twitter (@CWMTeam), and Instagram (@WalkerMotorsports).

Driver Jeff Fultz can also be found on various social media including Facebook (@JeffFultzRacing), Twitter (@JeffFultz) and Instagram (@JeffFultz).

CARS Response Energy Tour Returns to Dual Division Format at Myrtle Beach with $10,000 on the Line for Super Late Models

Photo: CARS Tour

Mooresville, NC – The 2018 season for the CARS Response Energy Tour kicks into high gear with the season kick-off for the Super Late Model division next weekend March 24th at Myrtle Beach (SC) Speedway. The $10,000 to win Bakerdist.com 200 pres. by Honeywell is expected to draw a hefty car count to the half-mile beachside South Carolina track.

The race will feature 100 green flag laps of racing for both divisions, however; the Super Late Model feature will feature a six-tire strategy element, with a four-minute break for tires and adjustment on lap 70 of 100. While all teams in attendance know that name of the game at Myrtle Beach is tire conservation, the element of the two tire change could really mix things up in the final thirty laps.

A few of the early entries include Raphael Lessard, now driving for Kyle Busch Motorsports. Lessard will compete full time on the tour in hopes of becoming the first driver in CARS history to win two championship titles. Jared Fryar transitions from the Late Model Stock division to the Super Late Models for the 2018 season. The Trinity, NC driver captured a Late Model Stock victory a season ago at Dominion Raceway. Preston Peltier will travel from his home, now located in snowy Colorado, to pilot the #33 Newton Concrete Chevrolet for the Roger Lee Newton owned team. Series newcomer Molly Hulmuth will also travel from “out West”, as she makes her series debut driving for Will Jones in 2018. Ryan Moore is another driver in the fold that comes to the Beach to make his series debut.

In addition to the Super Late Models, the Late Model Stock Cars will be in action as well, getting the tour back to its traditional two premier division format. Bobby McCarty, with his big win at Tri-County, carries all kinds of momentum into the race. However; the early favorite for the 100 lap race has to be JR Motorsports driver Josh Berry. Berry won the 2016 CARS Tour event and did the same last year at the track’s own Myrtle Beach 400 race in November. Several local drivers like Matt Cox will be taking advantage of the Staubli Hometown Hero Awards, receiving free Hoosier tires for competing against the touring stars. The addition of the track regulars can’t be ignored as Sam Yarbrough in 2015, schooled the series regulars at his home track enroot the race win.

Fans planning on making a weekend of it at the Beach can take advantage of free infield camping with purchase of a pit pass. Not camping, but want to watch the race from the infield? A special combo of two general admission tickets and one infield parking pass is also available for $50. For a complete listing of ticket options and prices, as well as the complete event schedule can be found by visit http://www.carsracingtour.com.

 

For additional information on the CARS Response Energy Tout and its Late Model Stock and Super Late Model divisions visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Response Energy Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

Matt Hirschman Scores Second Consecutive Victory in Modified Feature at Myrtle Beach

Matt Hirschman climbs from his modified for the second year in a row in Myrtle Beach Speedway victory lane. (Charlie Alexander/TheWeeklyRacer.com)

The tour type Modified’s were once again on the card for a 125-lap high-speed chess match for week two of the Myrtle Beach 400. This year track management and officials introduced a brand new component to the race – stages!

Yes, much like what you see in the top three tiers of the NASCAR circuits, the 125-lap feature was essentially split into four segments with cautions coming at lap 50, 75, and 100 with the final 25-lap segment being green flag laps only. A $500 bonus for each “segment win” was announced to help encourage the drivers to get up on the wheel as the modified portion of the weekend has been known for major tire conservation due to the abrasive track surface and soft tires the cars run.

Jim Zacharies was the fastest man in town earlier in the afternoon during group qualifying posting a lap of 19.755 to earn the pole position. Bobby Measmer Jr., Timmy Solomito, George Brunnhoelzl III, and Patrick Emerling rounded out the starting five when it came down to the race.

Zacharies and Solomito looked to be the early favorites when the green was displayed jumping out to a massive lead. The two would trade the top spot several times before placing a handful of cars a lap down. Solomito was able to take the lead from Zacharies just before the end of the first segment and pick up an extra $500 bucks. Zachaires would not pit during the caution and stay out on the track to retake the lead and eventually win the second stage, however, issues would prevent the pole sitter from even finishing the race. Both Bobby Measmer and Hirschman turned the wick up as the field went back green in the third segment. So much in fact that Measmer was able to power his way to the top spot, bringing Hirschman with him. Measmer was just in a league of his own as laps clicked off and drove away from the field to collect the lap 100-segment bonus.

Hirschman, the fifth different race leader, would inherit the race lead for the final 25-lap segment after The Weekly Racer learned that Bobby Measmer was penalized for entering pit lane to early at the lap 100 break. The break, if you will, was enough for Hirschman to take control of the race and drive away to victory. The race was slowed just once in the final segment as GB3 has issues in turns three and four. Hirschman, however, able to hold his own and build over a second lead over the field. Give a shout out to Bobby Measamer who was able to drive all the way back to the third position in the closing laps.

“There was a bunch of different strategies that the other guys used and were actually a little surprising and interesting to me something to think about,” Hirschman said in victory lane. “They put up the $500 for the stages so it was something to shoot for. We were close on the last one and ended up second, the seventeen [Measmer] was just really good there and drove away. I knew I wasn’t going to be able to run him back down. It worked out; we lead the laps we wanted to and the most important one, the last one. A couple of guys picked up some money and it would have been nice to add to our win total but we can’t complain, we came here with the goal to win the race. I am really happy to PD Motorsports; two years in a row to win this race its great.”

 

Modified UNOFFICIAL Results 

1 #60 Matt Hirschman 125
2 #4M Jason Myers 125
3 #17M Bobby Measmer Jr. 125
4 #3 Daren Scherer 125
5 #17B Danny Bohn 125
6 #11M Burt Myers 125
7 #7NY Timmy Solomito 125
8 #07 Patrick Emerling 125
9 #00 Jeff Fultz 125
10 #18Y Daniel Yates 125
11 #4TR Jason Tutterow 125
12 #79 George Brunnhoelzl III 124
13 #12N Mike Norman 122
14 #48 Johnny Kay 113
15 #71 Jim Zacharies 99

Ep. 05 Opening Night For NWMT, South Boston, Southern National & CARS Tour at Dominion

Join the guys as they bring their second quest in a row onto the show and talk about all the action in March.

NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour season opener at Myrtle Beach Speedway.

Phillip Morris Doubles Down in South Boston to collect two wins in their season opener. We talk about the new pavement.

Tyler Hughes and Tim Allensworth split the bill at Southern National in their rescheduled, Sunday season opener.

To Wrap things up we talk about the CARS Tour Duel races at Dominion Raceway where two new Late Model winners were crowned (after the disqualification and suspension of race two winner Jeff Oakley) as well as a dominating performance from Brandon Setzer who locked himself into the Short Track Nationals at Bristol with his two wins.

2016 Snap Shots and Year End Review

year-end-review-photoWow, yet another year as come and gone and boy what a season it provided. 2016 proved to be a year of ups and downs for both the race teams and us here at The Weekly Racer. However, just like most race teams, with some hard work, long nights, and a lot of faith, we were able to pull off some pretty cool things this year. We set out on a mission to grow our audience again and reach more folks that love short track racing and boy let me tell you what, we meet that goal and surpassed it!

TWR hit the road in 2016 with the hopes of visiting some new race tracks and the staff did just that. Dominion Raceway & Virginia Motor Speedway* in Virginia along with Carteret County Speedway, Boman Gray Stadium, and Dixieland Speedway in North Carolina were all new short track shows we brought you to this year. Granted we put a little asterisk next to Virginia Motor Speedway as every time we attempted the trip we got rained out, there is always 2017 though.

2016 saw the rise of Facebook LIVE streaming which TWR took full advantage of bringing our readers as close to the action as wifi and cell service would allow it. The following and request we got for races from those who were most of the time from a different state were truly amazing. Not to mention seeing some of the highest numbers in viewer traffic means we are doing our job to bring you to some of the best short-track racing in the country!

We look forward to 2017 being yet another record year as Eric Church would say. We are excited to bring you monthly podcasts with guests from all over the circuits. New tracks, new series and hopefully new writers with fresh opinions and stories from the sport we love. Bellow are just a few ‘Snap Shots’ from 2016 that we here at The Weekly Racer would like to highlight in no particular order. Every year around this time we have spotlighted paint schemes or races, this year we want to highlight moments that stuck out to us. What are you 2016 Snap Shots, feel free to leave a comment!

 

Louis White Wins the Battle – Brenden Queen Wins the War

Photo: Casey Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com

Photo: Casey Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com

Chevy -vs- Ford, Pearson -vs- Petty, Earnhardt -vs- Gordon are just some of the rivalries we have seen over the years in this crazy sport we love. Some forged from nothing while others were forged from the unspoken respect towards each other. Sometimes you just have a difference of opinion or a different viewpoint on a certain incident. Other times it’s just good ole’ Old School -vs- New School.

2016 witness a birth of a new rivalry on the high banks of East Carolina Motorspeedway, amongst those that have continued for years, between two racers, who in our very humble opinion, are not much different other than the year they were born. Louis White of Plymouth, North Carolina has been racing longer than Brenden Queen of Chesapeake, Virginia has been on this earth but when the two came together, it was a battle like no other.

Yes, these two had plenty of run-ins, both literally and figuratively, on the racing surface throughout 2016 but I’m pretty sure they both had the same mentality; Let’s get this championship and don’t let my guys down. Fans and drivers alike witnessed plenty of vinyl exchange on the weekends and words exchange throughout the week. Particularly when the two, along with several others, were involved in one of the wildest wrecks I have seen in my ten plus years going racing.

Our snapshot that we want to take away from these two this year is exactly what’s pictured above. Two men, putting everything on the line for the sport they love for their friends, family, and sponsors, to come together and show each other respect during the last race of the year. Louis White ended up winning the final race of the season – which was actually his second Ronnie Barnett Memorial win – with Queen finishing second the points spread that was enough for Queen to secure the track championship. Though Louis White won the “battle,” Queen was able to win the “war,” Louis White asked Queen to take a victory lap with him. White sporting the checkers and Queen sporting the American flag just like his favorite NASCAR driver Brad Keselowski – which ironically enough is the boyfriend of Louis Whites daughter and father of his grandchild.

 

 

Thrilling K&N East Finish at Dominion Speedway Debut

If there were awards to give out here at The Weekly Racer for best finishes, the NASCAR K&N Pro Series East finish at Dominion Raceway on Memorial Day weekend would certainly be among the top contenders. Making their debut at the newly opened 4/10-mile, high banked oval, Spencer Davis and eventual champion Justin Haley put on one hell of a show for the fans in attendance on Memorial Day weekend.

Our snapshot was the last half of the last lap where Justin Haley made every attempt possible to steal the victory away from Davis. In one of the closest finish in K&N East history, Davis edged out Haley by just .005 seconds. Just about everyone in the complex were on their feet as the two entered turn three knowing the shot was coming. The two made contact coming down the front stretch and it was a drag race to the finish line. Easily one of the top finishes we witnessed in 2016.

The sight around the track mirrored much like the Xfinity race at Talladega where two drivers were waiting on the front stretch for NASCAR to review the finish and declare a winner. I cannot imagine what it was like for either of the drivers sitting there, facing each other still strapped in their cars waiting. This race will certainly go down as one of the closest races The Weekly Racer was involved in.

 

Bradley McCaskill’s Road to Recovery Leads to Victory Lane

llm3

If you have been following short track racing in the Mid-Atlantic then you know Bradley McCaskill’s journey through 2016 wasn’t the easiest, to say the least. McCaskill was involved in a pretty bad wreck earlier in the summer at East Carolina Motor Speedway that left him with burns all over his body. Spending the rest of summer on the road to recovery it was great news just to hear the McCaskill was able to get back home to his business and more importantly his family. Things didn’t stop there for McCaskill though. With the help from his family, doctors, and some support from the racing community, McCaskill was able to return to what he loved, racing.

Our snapshot is from the Saturday night portion of the Thanksgiving Classic. McCaskill all but dominated the Limited Late Model feature in a car prepared by Louis White and found his way back to victory lane. McCaskill made a very strong statement in his return to Late Model racing, his win came on the heels of not only making it into the prestigious Martinsville race but earning a top twenty finish. To be able to watch McCaskill dominate the way he did and celebrate in victory lane with his family and Louis White should be a reminder to never give up and always keep fighting.

 

Christian Eckes Edges Teammate Josh Berry in Thrilling Last Lap Pass

For the second year in a row, we were able to make the trip down to Myrtle Beach Speedway for the annual Myrtle Beach 400. A “post season” Late Model feature, much like Martinsville and SNMP, bringing some of the best in the business to one track for 200-laps of door-to-door action. We almost picked the entire race as our snapshot with the amount of true racing that was going on throughout the entire field. We figured it would be a good idea to pick just one moment from that weekend for the interest of time.

The last lap battle between JRM teammates Josh Bery and Christian Eckes was one for the record books. If you weren’t there or didn’t see our Tweet after the race we have included the link above for your viewing pleasure. Much like the finish in the K&N series at Dominion, 200-laps of racing came down to just inches as Eckes edged out Berry at the line after the two bounced off of each other. Was truly one of the most thrilling finishes that we have witnessed since being on this side of business.

 

Mike Looney Holds of Late Model Greats to Win Martinsville

Casey Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com

Casey Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com

If you are a Late Model fan and Martinsville as a whole is not one your annual snapshots then you are doing something wrong. Year after year over eighty cars make their way to the famous paper clip half mile speedway located in Ridgeway, Virginia all with different goals in mind; making the feature, finishing top 20, or winning that famous grandfather clock. It is a race like no other in the Mid-Atlantic and anyone in the racing community understands this. To win here in a Late Model is putting your name down in history.

It was a fairy tale story for Mike Looney this past October when he took the Late Model community by storm. Showing impressive speed during the test session a couple weeks prior to running towards the front all day long. Looney locked himself into the 200-lap feature by winning the pole award the day before. Not something out of the ordinary right? A small team doing everything in their power to make sure they make the show, there is no way they will be competitive come race time. Wrong!

Of course in a 200-lap race, you will have your different leaders as some drivers will push harder at different segments. Mike Looney, however, was like that mosquito bite that will just never go away. Keeping his car in one piece, for the most part, all day long and being a factor there at the end. This is like a three-part snapshot if you will for us here at The Weekly Racer. The first coming from the somewhat shock of Looney winning the pole, followed by the run he gave previous race winner Lee Pulliam there at the end when the two made contact, followed by the knee he took next to his car in victory lane

 

 

Nick Smith’s Twelve Win Season Earns Him Dominion Speedways Very First Title

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Photo: Justin Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com

To win a race in a Late Model Stock Car here in the Mid-Atlantic is one thing, to win twelve of them en route to your first Late Model championship is something else. Nick Smith did just that this year at newly opened Dominion Raceway located in Thornburg, Virginia. Averaging more than eighteen cars on a given weekend it wasn’t always cake and ice cream so to speak for the Hampton, Virginia driver. Racing with the likes of Jeff Oakley, Trent & Doug Barnes, along with a few visits from 2016 NWAAS National Champ Matt Bowling.

Some wins were pure domination, others probably had a lot to do with luck, and a few ended in the tech shed. However, the moment for us that made this a memorable snapshot was the moment pictured above, the moment you figure out you are the champion. See, the final race of the season was an interesting one at Dominion Raceway. It was a total of 150-laps broken down into three segments along with two different inverts – something we haven’t really seen done in Late Model racing before. Even though Nick Smith was unable to win that particular battle that evening and bring his win total to thirteen, he was able to score enough points to secure the very first Dominion Raceway championship.

The moment the announcement was made the champagne went flying and Smith was able to celebrate with his family, friends, and crew.

Christian Eckes Edges Out JRM Teammate Josh Berry for Myrtle Beach Victory

16 year old Christian Eckes celebrates in victory lane after a thrilling pass on the final lap. (Justin Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com)

16 year old Christian Eckes celebrates in victory lane after a thrilling pass on the final lap. (Justin Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com)

Myrtle Beach, SC – It was truly a race for the record books as 43 cars took the green flag Saturday night in the 2016 edition of the Myrtle Beach 400. The finale race of the Myrtle Beach Speedway season bring some of the best late model drivers from the east coast together to go to war not only for the check and the trophy but for the bragging rights.

Christian Eckes, 16 of Middletown, New York, was impressive early in the afternoon when he qualified in the third position, locking himself into the feature and saving twenty-five laps on his tires, a major key to success at Myrtle Beach. Eckes proved to be impressive from the drop of the green flag never falling outside of the top ten.

The 225 lap race was split into two segments the first being a 125-lap stent followed by a ten minute break where teams could make typical pit stop adjustments, add fuel and change up to four tires. Eckes did a great job saving his equipment and tires all while competing for spots within the top ten all night long.

After the intermission per se, Eckes started to turn the whick up and mounted a couple charges for the race lead. Using the top side to his advantage Christian was able to lead a few laps early but would be over taken by the likes of Lemons – before his motor expired going into three – Pulliam, Snider, and teammate Josh Berry.

Business really started picking up in the top ten as the laps counted down. Nose to tail and door-to-door, sometimes even up to three wide. Eckes really started to put the moves on the field with just under about ten laps to go. Working to get around Lee Pulliam to take the second position away, Eckes had to make things happen in a hurry to catch teammate Josh Berry who had opened up about a five to six car lead.

The five-car advantage that Berry had built was quickly lost in just under five laps. Eckes was clearly better on corner entry. The pass for the lead was on has the two went into turn three coming to two laps to go. Eckes was able to get under the #88 of Berry. Eckes tried to clear Berry out of two but couldn’t make it happen. The two would come off turn four even and take the white flag locked door to door. Berry making the outside line work to his advantage was giving it everything the car could handle. Eckes sailed the car off into three some how made it stick and came off turn four even up with Berry. The two would touch, Berry would be pinched up in the outside wall, just enough to stall his momentum and Christian Eckes would grab the checkered flag by maybe a foot or two.

“This is absolutely crazy,” Eckes said in victory lane. “We have finished second to him [Josh] so many times. Its good to finally be able to beat him its unbelievable it really is. To pass Lee Pulliam and get to Josh its just a huge confidence booster.”

“The last couple of laps were just insane,” Eckes explained. “We got to Lee and he raced us real clean, I really applaud him for that. We had a pretty good car there and we got to Josh fairly quick. I had a really good run coming out of four and I kind of got clear of him coming off two but I messed up a little bit and he got back up to me.”

“He [Josh] gave me plenty of room in three and four,” Christian told The Weekly Racer. “I knew I had to get everything I could coming to the line. I ran him into the wall a little bit there, which I kind of feel bad about but it’s the Myrtle Beach 400, its defiantly worth it I guess you could say. I am just really happy for this whole team.”

 

UNOFFICIAL MB400 Results

1.#1 Christian Eckes
2. #88 Josh Berry
3. #5 Lee Pullaim
4. #02 Justin Milliken
5. #2 Myatt Snider
6. #41 Trey Gibson
7. #03 Brenden Queen
8. #95 Chad McCumbee
9. #51 Kason Plott
10. #8 Tyler Hughes
11. #36 Anthony Anders
12. #60 Neil Meredith
13. #36 Neil Meredith
14. #12 Auston McDaniel
15. #32 Jerry Miracle
16. #87 Mike Looney
17. #97 Greg Edwards
18. #18 Jason York
19. #15 Dexter Canipe Jr.
20. #18 David Roberts
21. #26 Danny Edwards Jr.
22. #20 Sam Yarbrough
23. #51 Devin O’Connell
24. #17 Ryan Millington
25. #1 Blair Addis
26. #51 Matt Cox
27. #44 Justin Johnson
28. #4 Dylan Hall
29. #7 Michael Hardin
30. #94 Jamie Weatherford
31. #3 Willie Grainger
32. #00 Shane Lee
33. #27 Tommy Lemons Jr
34. #4 Annabeth Barnes-Crum
35. #30 Brian Vause
36. #5 Tyler English
37. #2 Kevin Leight
38. #11 Lucas Williams
39. #33 Macey Causey
40. #16 RD Smith
41. #34 Dylan Smith
42. #83 Matt Bowling
43. #5 Anthony Alfredo

Tommy Lemons Jr. Wins Back-to-Back Pole Awards At Myrtle Beach

img_9977Myrtle Beach, SC –  For the second year in a row, Tommy Lemons Jr. has claimed the pole in the final race of the season here at Myrtle Beach Speedway. Lemons decided to take his own fate in his hands, as he was guaranteed no less than a fifth place starting position after winning the Ice Breaker 200 earlier in the year.

“I realy felt like I left a lot on the table,” Lemons said during the fan meet and greet. “I just over drove the car there on that second lap, it just felt like I could of run a little bit faster. “

As mentioned above Lemons Jr bested the times of Alfredo, JRM driver Christian Eckes, Justin Johnson and Kason Plott – the starting five drivers for the 2016 Myrtle Beach 400. Lemons pretty much put on a racing clinic back in the spring which may have helped build the note book for this race. Which if I may, is running a new format this year from previous events.

“The format doesn’t really change our game plane to much really. Back in the spring we ran 125 straight here so its all about running as hard as you can and keeping as much tire under it as you can. That’s kind of the game plan and just hope we can be around there at the end.”

Testing and qualifying all completed in the daytime here at Myrtle Beach Speedway but we will go green shortly after 6:00 PM tonight after the sun has set. Lemons not all that concerned and feels he has a really good piece with him this weekend.

“I feel like we got a really good car,” Lemons said about the race. “I was a little iffy there in practice. It felt like we had a decent car but after qualifying I think we have a really good car. We still have to ride around and save tires as much as possible. Hopefully we can stay out front and dictate what everyone else does.”

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