Tag Archives: CARS Tour

CARS Response Energy Tour Releases 2019 Season Schedule

Mooresville, NC —The 2019 calendar year will mark the fifth anniversary for the CARS Tour, and its second season with tour title sponsor Response Energy Drink on board. Over the four previous seasons the CARS Tour has hosted 85 different races between both the Super Late Model and Late Model Stock divisions.

Throughout those events, 353 different drivers have made a start in CARS Tour competition, with over $2.1 million dollars in purse money being paid out during that period.

With the 2018 season championships still to be decided for both the Late Model Stock and the Super Late Model divisions at South Boston Speedway on November 3rd, the tour is proud to announce the 2019 season schedule.

The schedule consists of 11 points races and 1 non-points race for Late Model Stock Cars and 8 championship points races for Super Late Models. The CARS Response Energy Tour will once again host events in North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee. For the first time in series history the tour will not visit the Palmetto State, however, the series will make much anticipated returns to familiar tracks in Southern National, Motor Mile, and Dominion Raceway. Another stellar edition to the tour, will be the series debut at Langley Speedway in Hampton, Virginia, to go along with the previously announced non-points Late Model Stock Car race on the Dominion Raceway two mile road course.

“We are proud of this schedule and we are happy to get it out early so our competitors, fans, and our partner tracks can plan appropriately for the 2019 season. While we are sad to see awesome events at tracks like Wake County and Myrtle Beach go away, there’s no doubt that they’ll be back with the CARS Tour in the future. We’ve always made it a priority to mix things up on our schedule to prevent it from becoming stale,” explained CARS Tour Series Director, Chris Ragle. “With that said I think we have great 2019 schedule at some phenomenal facilities.

With the return of the Touring 12 program, the $500 bonus for running three races in a row, The Old North State Nationals for Late Model Stocks, 40% of the Super Late Model races paying $10,000 to win, two co-sanctioned Super Late Model events, and the 3rd Annual Mid Atlantic Classic we should have a great fifth anniversary season ahead of us.”

For additional information on the CARS Response Energy Late Model Stock Tour and the CARS Response Energy Super Late Model Tour visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

2019 Late Model Stock Car Schedule Highlights

-2019 season opener at Southern National Motorsports Park increased overall purse and paying $10,000 to the winner

-Inaugural “Old North State Nationals” at Orange County Speedway April 6-7, 2019 will be the largest paying LMSC race in history with a minimum of $30,000 going to the winner and a minimum of $1,250 awarded to start the six tire feature event. An announcement of a “Stimulus Program” for competitors to pay for their race expense via supporters and grow the race purse leading up to the event will be announced in the coming weeks.

-CARS Late Model Stock Car Tour debut at the beautiful Langley Speedway in Hampton, Virginia on June 8.

-The third annual Throwback 276 at Hickory Motor Speedway continues on its traditional date of August 3rd.

-For the third consecutive season the 2019 LMSC champion will be crowned at South Boston Speedway.

2019 Super Late Model Schedule Highlights

-2019 season opener at Southern National Motorsports Park paying $10,000 to the winner.

-The co-sanctioned race between the CARS Tour, Southern Super Series, and CRA at the Fairgrounds Speedway in Nashville, Tennessee moves to May 4th.

-The 3rd Annual Mid Atlantic Classic at Orange County Speedway, that will once again pay $10,000 to win and an overall increased purse, moves to August 24th.

-The third annual Throwback 276 at Hickory Motor Speedway continues on its traditional date of August 3rd.

-The return of Super Late Models to the ultra-fast and beautiful Motor Mile Speedway in Radford, Virginia happens on May 18th. This will be the first time SLM have graced the track since the 2015 inaugural season.

-Nearly 40% of the Super Late Model scheduled races in 2019 will pay $10,000 to win.

2019 CARS Response Energy Tour Schedule

March 9 Southern National Motorsport Park – Kenly, NC SLM-$10,000/LMSC-$10,000

March 23 Hickory Motor Speedway – Hickory, NC SLM/LMSC

April 6-7 Orange County Speedway (Old North State Nationals) – Rougemont, NC LMSC-$30,000

May 3 Ace Speedway – Elon, NC LMSC

May 4 Fairgrounds Speedway – Nashville, TN SLM*

May 18 Motor Mile Speedway – Radford, VA SLM/LMSC

June 1 TBA SLM*

June 8 Langley Speedway – Hampton, VA LMSC

June 22 Dominion Raceway – Thornburg, VA LMSC

July 13 Carteret County Speedway – Swansboro, NC LMSC

August 2-3 Hickory Motor Speedway (Throwback 276) – Hickory, NC SLM/LMSC

August 24 Orange County Speedway (Mid Atlantic Classic) – Rougemont, NC SLM-$10,000/LMSC

Nov. 2 South Boston Speedway – South Boston, VA SLM/LMSC

Nov. 16 Dominion Raceway Road Course – Thornburg, VA LMSC**

*Co-sanctioned race with CRA, SSS, and CARS Tour

**Non-points race

***Additional $10,000 to win SLM race at already schedule event TBD

#Podcast: S02E13 – CARS Response Energy Tour Mid Season Recap

 

Jesse Vaughn is finally back and looking to recap the first half of the CARS Tour season focusing on how things have been going with his team and driver. We also give top five finishers for the Late Model Stock portion. Discuss the most recent… flair of attention the tour has gotten and well as look ahead to the rest of the season.

 

Want to share your thoughts with us or maybe even with our audience? Have an idea for a show topic? Email us at podcast@theweeklyracer.com! Make sure you also hit the Subscribe button on your favorite podcast app and give us rating and review. We want to know how to better serve you and your racing addiction. You can also follow us on Twitter @shorttrackrpt. You can find Jesse @VaughanJD and you can find me @JustTEN_2. For LIVE updates from short tracks in the Mid-Atlantic follow @theweeklyracer

Tiniest Track May Produce Biggest Action for CARS Response Energy Tour

Mooresville, NC – Just because it is small does not mean it is not a big deal. That is what fans are echoing about the CARS Response Energy Tour coming to Wake County Speedway next Saturday night. The tour will make its inaugural visit to “America’s Favorite Bullring” on April 7th, and all indications point to a twenty-plus car field anticipated with some of the best Late Model Stock drivers in the country in attendance.

Championship points leader Bobby McCarty leads the list of entries, with JR Motorsports driver Josh Berry and Ronald “The Thrill” Hill rounding out the top three in championship points. From there, fans will be treated to a handful of drivers making their first ever visit to the .24-mile track. Four-time NASCAR Whelen All-American National Champion Lee Pulliam, Touring 12 drivers Ty Gibbs, Cody Haskins, Sam Mayer, and Justin Johnson are just a few of the guys who have never been to Wake.

While there are those who have never been to Wake County, there are a few drivers who started their careers at Wake County. Local racer Thomas Chappell, Bradley McCaskill, and 2016 series champion Deac McCaskill have all spent their fair share of time behind the wheel of a racecar at Wake County. The word echoed amongst those who have raced there to the ones that have not is patience.

“It’s a tight small track, but its track that you can race at for sure. As a driver, you have to be patiently aggressive at Wake County. You have to attack the track with your car, but other cars out there you have to be patient and let the positions come to you,” noted Bradley McCaskill. “I know it’s going to be a packed house and everyone’s energy is going to be up, but we’ve all got to run our own race and not worry about the car next to us not matter what happens out there.

For his cousin Deac McCaskill, the opportunity to race at the track where he met his wife and began his racing career is a pretty special occasion.

“Wake County is where I started racing at years ago in the four-cylinder division, then I eventually moved to Super Late Models in the early 2000s. We won a few races there over the years then, and hope that we can bring a few of those old memories back,” explained McCaskill. “To be able to be going back to Wake with the CARS Tour, and race in front what everyone’s talking about, might be the biggest crowd in the tracks recent history, is really something special to me. A big thanks has to go to the CARS Tour, all the race sponsors, and Wake County Speedway for making this race happen.”

Fans attending the Solid Rock Carriers 123 presented by JEDO Lawncare have a reason to make a weekend of it with the addition of the “Prelude to the Bullring” go-kart shootout presented by Grafix Solution & John West Racing Engines at Rush Hour Karting indoor karting. The indoor karting facility, located just 9.4 miles from the track, Friday, April 6th from 8:30-10pm. The CARS Response Energy Tour will take over the facility and all CARS Tour fans, drivers, and team members are encouraged to attend for the opportunity to race with their favorite driver or simply cheer them on alongside friends. Food and drink specials will also be available. The entry fee for anyone to participate in the kart race is only $20. For additional information, visit http://www.carsracingtour.com/assets/wake_co_kart_shootout.pdf.

Tickets for the Solid Rock Carriers 123 presented by JEDO Lawncare are $20 in advance and $25 at the gate, with family four pack of tickets only $50 in advance and $60 at the gate. Youth 8-12 years old are $10 in advance and $12 the day of the show. Fans are heavily encouraged to get their tickets in advance at www.carsracingtour.com before the Tuesday April 3rd deadline in order to avoid delays at the ticket booth as a large crowd is expected.

 

For additional information on the CARS Late Model Stock Tour and the CARS Super Late Model Tour visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

Myrtle Beach CARS Tour Victory Super Sweet For Fultz and Walker

Photo: CARS Tour Press Release

MOORESVILLE, NC – It really isn’t a dream for Chris Walker. The long-time car owner in late model and ProCup circles is still pinching himself every morning since his team picked up their first win in the BakerDist.com 200 at Myrtle Beach Speedway on Saturday, the opening super late model race of the season for the CARS Response Energy Tour.

“This morning when I woke up, the check and the trophy are sitting on my fireplace mantle, but it still hasn’t sunk in,” Walker admitted. “That first one, it’s hard to top it.”

For many outside of the team’s inner circle, it was hard to believe the race was his first win in nearly a decade of car ownership. Most team owners who have had the litany of drivers in their machines as Walker has routinely are associated with winning. And though he had been close, it never happened before. “I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve

“I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve won, and to be a winning owner for the first time, I don’t think you’ll ever top that. It means the world to me. Me and Fultz hung out last night, and he’s won a ton of races, but I think he sees in me how excited I am.”The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz

The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz mingle with away from the track. Yes, their careers are involved in professional motorsports positions during any other weekend, but the schedules lined up to create the crew they used this past weekend. “The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”

“The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends.

During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends. When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.

When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.”It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”

“It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70

After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70 break for tires.”I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”

“I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.

Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.”I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure

“I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure], but didn’t know what it would do when they built up some heat. When we jacked up the left side and Weeder said the left rear still had the centerline in it, then I knew he knew he’d been saving. When we knew that, I knew we had a pretty good piece, all we did was put some tape on the grille and cleaned it. I knew then it was good to go, I just didn’t know if he was going to stretch it out or if there was going to be a lot of cautions or if Raphael or Craig were going to come flying back up. You didn’t know who had rode because the pace was really, really slow.”Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.

Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.”I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”

“I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.

Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.”There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the

“There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the start finish line and it looked like he got a good run. He raced me clean, but if I was racing someone else I would’ve been a little bit more nervous they would’ve run into the back of me or something like that.”Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.

Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.”That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.”

“That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.””You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”

“You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.

And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.”I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care

“I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care to. I would rather put him in it, or if we can rent it, because there’s no more house cars at Fury, that’s fine. If we can go play and have fun, like this one because it all worked out, that’s fine too. We’re all good friends off the track, go out to eat together, hang out, call, whether racing or not. I think the knowledge is what got us there. Without our core guys, sure, it was a fluke win, but with Fultz, Fritz, Mike Darne, Weeder — everyone together put us there.”I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It

“I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It kinda, sorta has, but not yet.” While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the

While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the comraderie of their buddies. Although he and Fultz have been friends for years, it was an otherwise casual conversation which lit the fire for what has already been a successful partnership.”He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

“He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

For more information on Walker Motorsports, visit their website at ChrisWalkerMotorsports.com, follow them on Facebook (@ChrisWalkerMotorsportsInc), Twitter (@CWMTeam), and Instagram (@WalkerMotorsports).

Driver Jeff Fultz can also be found on various social media including Facebook (@JeffFultzRacing), Twitter (@JeffFultz) and Instagram (@JeffFultz).

CARS Response Energy Tour Returns to Dual Division Format at Myrtle Beach with $10,000 on the Line for Super Late Models

Photo: CARS Tour

Mooresville, NC – The 2018 season for the CARS Response Energy Tour kicks into high gear with the season kick-off for the Super Late Model division next weekend March 24th at Myrtle Beach (SC) Speedway. The $10,000 to win Bakerdist.com 200 pres. by Honeywell is expected to draw a hefty car count to the half-mile beachside South Carolina track.

The race will feature 100 green flag laps of racing for both divisions, however; the Super Late Model feature will feature a six-tire strategy element, with a four-minute break for tires and adjustment on lap 70 of 100. While all teams in attendance know that name of the game at Myrtle Beach is tire conservation, the element of the two tire change could really mix things up in the final thirty laps.

A few of the early entries include Raphael Lessard, now driving for Kyle Busch Motorsports. Lessard will compete full time on the tour in hopes of becoming the first driver in CARS history to win two championship titles. Jared Fryar transitions from the Late Model Stock division to the Super Late Models for the 2018 season. The Trinity, NC driver captured a Late Model Stock victory a season ago at Dominion Raceway. Preston Peltier will travel from his home, now located in snowy Colorado, to pilot the #33 Newton Concrete Chevrolet for the Roger Lee Newton owned team. Series newcomer Molly Hulmuth will also travel from “out West”, as she makes her series debut driving for Will Jones in 2018. Ryan Moore is another driver in the fold that comes to the Beach to make his series debut.

In addition to the Super Late Models, the Late Model Stock Cars will be in action as well, getting the tour back to its traditional two premier division format. Bobby McCarty, with his big win at Tri-County, carries all kinds of momentum into the race. However; the early favorite for the 100 lap race has to be JR Motorsports driver Josh Berry. Berry won the 2016 CARS Tour event and did the same last year at the track’s own Myrtle Beach 400 race in November. Several local drivers like Matt Cox will be taking advantage of the Staubli Hometown Hero Awards, receiving free Hoosier tires for competing against the touring stars. The addition of the track regulars can’t be ignored as Sam Yarbrough in 2015, schooled the series regulars at his home track enroot the race win.

Fans planning on making a weekend of it at the Beach can take advantage of free infield camping with purchase of a pit pass. Not camping, but want to watch the race from the infield? A special combo of two general admission tickets and one infield parking pass is also available for $50. For a complete listing of ticket options and prices, as well as the complete event schedule can be found by visit http://www.carsracingtour.com.

 

For additional information on the CARS Response Energy Tout and its Late Model Stock and Super Late Model divisions visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Response Energy Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

S02E11 – 2018 Season and Series Previews from the Mid Atlantic

The guys get back together for the first time in 2018 to talk about the recent races in the national series, ARCA, as well as the K&N Pro Series East season opener in Florida. We also take a look at six different tracks schedules throughout the Mid-Atlantic region along with the CARS Tour. Jesse announces he will be spotting full-time for #TeamRacingVirginia driver Grayson Cullather in the CARS Tour LMSC program.

Facebook: The Weekly Racer

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2018 CARS Late Model Stock Tour Season Opener Could be Most Talented Field in Series History

Mooresville, NC – The first ever CARS Tour race in 2015 at Southern National featured 36 cars with some of the top names in the region competing. Fast forward to the upcoming Do The Dew 150 on March 10th at Tri-County Motor Speedway, and all indications show that the 2018 season opener could outdo that inaugural event.

Headlining the list of early pre-entries are defending CARS Tour champion Josh Berry driving for JR Motorsports, 2016 CARS Tour champion Deac McCaskill, and making his CARS Tour debut, four-time and defending NASCAR All American champion Lee Pulliam. The Semora, NC driver has never raced at the Hudson, NC track but is looking forward to the challenge and competing on the CARS Tour circuit.

“I’m really excited to be making my CARS Tour debut at Tri-County. The last time I raced a CARS race, was 2013 when it was still the Pro Cup cars, that race was $10,000 to win and I ended up in victory lane so it would be nice to pick up where I left off,” noted Pullium. “I’ve never raced at Tri-County but have watched some videos and I’m really looking forward to getting on track there. It seems to be a place that has multiple grooves, which as a racer you really enjoy because it allows you to move around throughout the race to find speed and fix any handling problems you might have in your car. With a limited schedule this year, I’ve got a lot of emphasis on this race and making it our goal to end up in victory lane at a CARS Tour race.”

Plenty of local flare will be in attendance as well led by Touring 12 driver Charlie Watson from nearby Lenoir, NC. Thomas Beane (Hudson), Dexter Canipe Jr. (Claremont), and part-time NASCAR Truck Series competitor Landon Huffman (Claremont) will look to keep the $10,000 winner’s check close to home. All three drivers have never won a CARS Tour race, but out of all the expected in attendance, these three drivers will have the most experience around the Caldwell County 4/10th mile track.

Ronald Hill, Craig Moore, Justin Johnson, Ty Gibbs, and 2017 CARS LMSC Tour points runner-up Layne Riggs, are just a handful of the Touring 12 drivers that will kick off their attempt at putting their name on the Bob Brooks Memorial championship trophy at season’s end. Fresh-faced Touring 12 drivers Brandon Pierce, Grayson Cullather, Cody Haskins, Bradley McCaskill, and Sam Meyer will also be a welcome sight to the series this season. The five drivers have just fifteen combined CARS Tour starts among them when they roll through the tunnel at Tri-County.

In addition to the Late Model Stock race, a 75 lap Limited Late Model race is expected to draw a large field as well. The race will pay $13,100 in prize money with $2,500 going to the winner. Limited teams wanting to compete in the event can enter online in advance via the CARS Tour website http://www.carsracingtour.com. Entry fee for the LLM race is $100 if submitted online by 4pm on March 6th. An additional late fee of $50 will be added to all entries past the pre-entry deadline period.

The event schedule and tickets are on sale now at http://www.carsracingtour.com. Fans planning on attending the event need to bring their Mtn Dew products to the gate the day of the race for $3 off general admission tickets. Additional discounts on general admission tickets, Mtn Dew four packs (4 tickets, 4 hot dogs, 4 tickets: $60), and Pepsi Park It (2 tickets, 1 parking spot: $45) trackside parking spots are also available online only.

 

For additional information on the CARS Late Model Stock Tour and the CARS Super Late Model Tour visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

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