Category Archives: Super Late Model

Myrtle Beach CARS Tour Victory Super Sweet For Fultz and Walker

Photo: CARS Tour Press Release

MOORESVILLE, NC – It really isn’t a dream for Chris Walker. The long-time car owner in late model and ProCup circles is still pinching himself every morning since his team picked up their first win in the BakerDist.com 200 at Myrtle Beach Speedway on Saturday, the opening super late model race of the season for the CARS Response Energy Tour.

“This morning when I woke up, the check and the trophy are sitting on my fireplace mantle, but it still hasn’t sunk in,” Walker admitted. “That first one, it’s hard to top it.”

For many outside of the team’s inner circle, it was hard to believe the race was his first win in nearly a decade of car ownership. Most team owners who have had the litany of drivers in their machines as Walker has routinely are associated with winning. And though he had been close, it never happened before. “I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve

“I’ve owned cars from back around ’09 in the Hedgecock late model days and Alex Yontz has driven for me, Brandon Butler, Tommy Lemons, Clay Rogers and others, but I don’t think you’ll ever top this one unless we move up and run Trucks or something like that,” the 33-year old car owner said. “That’s what so many people couldn’t believe. My close friends knew that was my first one. Other people, they knew we had ProCup cars before and I’ve been with people who’ve won, and to be a winning owner for the first time, I don’t think you’ll ever top that. It means the world to me. Me and Fultz hung out last night, and he’s won a ton of races, but I think he sees in me how excited I am.”The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz

The end result was the product of a weekend’s worth of work with a piecemeal team. In a period when many teams have paid crews dedicated to making their car perform, Walker’s crew was all-volunteer and a group of friends he and Fultz mingle with away from the track. Yes, their careers are involved in professional motorsports positions during any other weekend, but the schedules lined up to create the crew they used this past weekend. “The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”

“The weekend went really smooth from tech to Saturday, getting through tech and getting tires and all of that stuff,” driver Jeff Fultz said of the weekend. “We had no issues with really anything. The car was brand new, so we had a few little things because it was new, normal stuff, but other than that I can’t say we had any issues at all. We build the cars and put them together, and they’re just built right.”During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends.

During the week, Fultz runs and manages Fury Racecars, the chassis builder for Walker Motorsports, so he has intricate knowledge of each car the business creates, Walker’s included. Because of this, the 46-year old has semi-retired from the driver’s seat, racing part-time as his schedule allows with customers often needing his assistance on race weekends. When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.

When the opportunity came from Walker to race at Myrtle Beach, one of his favorite tracks, Fultz jumped on it.”It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”

“It probably took four or five laps to get back into the swing of things, but it’s one of those places I probably excel better at,” Fultz explained. “I like driving it, it’s a place I sorta adapted to, even in All-Pro. It’s one of my favorite places to race because you have different driving styles and you have to be smoother and manage the car. It’s kind of like a chess game when you’re racing at Myrtle Beach. It can play out different ways. It’s such a fun place and it really suits what I like.”After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70

After the completion of Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, Fultz found himself the fastest car in the field for the 100-lap, $10,000-to-win race in his first outing with the team. Because of the multi-round format, he started the race in third, but it took only a minute until the No. 54 was out front. From that point forward, Fultz led the majority of the race up until the lap 70 break for tires.”I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”

“I ran just hard enough to where I wasn’t hurting the tires at all,” Fultz said of the first 70 laps of the race. “Trying not to abuse the tires was all I was trying to do. If someone wanted to push a little harder, I would just let ’em go. Preston tried to, and I pushed a little harder but still wasn’t hurting the tires. I know what it feels like when grip starts fading or if you’re sliding them. I think we all could’ve run a little faster without hurting them, especially getting new tires. I really would have raced a little harder, but it played out that way which was a lucky thing.”Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.

Walker also knew Fultz was good at tire management, likely the best in the field, but had some nervous energy entering the break.”I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure

“I was pretty emotional, still, with 30 laps to go at the break,” Walker said. “Weeder did a good job on the tires and gave him what he wanted, but it was a matter of how tight it was going to get with the right sides only. We had to go out low [on air pressure], but didn’t know what it would do when they built up some heat. When we jacked up the left side and Weeder said the left rear still had the centerline in it, then I knew he knew he’d been saving. When we knew that, I knew we had a pretty good piece, all we did was put some tape on the grille and cleaned it. I knew then it was good to go, I just didn’t know if he was going to stretch it out or if there was going to be a lot of cautions or if Raphael or Craig were going to come flying back up. You didn’t know who had rode because the pace was really, really slow.”Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.

Upon the green flag to resume the race, Fultz and the Walker Motorsports crew were full speed ahead. Knowing the race had been slower than normal up to that point, everyone was aware things would likely pick up rather quickly on the abrasive half-mile at Myrtle Beach Speedway. One one of the restarts, Fultz had a mental lapse and nearly cost himself the race.”I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”

“I was nervous, almost with every caution,” Walker said. “Like, one time, he got to the white line and got confused on where to start because CARS has a little different way of restarting, so when he launched I was hoping it didn’t get us put to the rear of the field just for that, they said that was our warning. I would say I was nervous the whole time.”Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.

Walker’s nerves continued for another 30 laps until Fultz cruised underneath the white flag, en route to what appeared to be a relatively easy win. Seconds later, again, a small mental mistake nearly cost the team victory within sight of the checkered flag.”There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the

“There was never an ‘oh crap,’ until turn three on the last lap, and I just got in too low, and I never do that,” Fultz recalled of the final circuit. “I almost slipped up. If it would’ve been anyone but Chandler (Smith) there, they would’ve run into me. I had to stop it so I wouldn’t give up too much of the bottom. Then, I spun the tires all the way up to the start finish line and it looked like he got a good run. He raced me clean, but if I was racing someone else I would’ve been a little bit more nervous they would’ve run into the back of me or something like that.”Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.

Walker recalled those moments in real-time, thinking back to everything which came together to make it happen.”That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.”

“That’s when all the emotions hit,” he said. “Fultz just got in the zone, and Fritz up there talking to him in his ear is really good. He just had to get up on the wheel, and I think that’s what he did. I felt like Chandler would race him, but not dump him to get the win. He had ’em, he just parked it in the center when it got tight, and he barely caught him at the end. His emotions were high too, I know he was feeling exactly what I was feeling. He worked all night Wednesday night by himself at the shop, and we worked around the clock the last three weeks because they were busy over there already building cars and putting clips on. He’s selling cars, talking to customers, traveling with Steven (Wallace), every weekend he’s raced. So, I think me and him had pretty much the same emotion. We both put everything we had into it.””You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”

“You do lose a little bit when you get a bit older, but I still get in cars quite a bit,” Fultz said, laughing off the moniker he’s been given as an ‘old man’ in the car. “This just shows how much the program is built here to help our customers. I still love to do it, if I just had to show up and race a car, I’d do it all day in any series. When you have to do everything – work on the car, build ’em, worry about business, worry about this, this, and make a living, we’ve kind of gone past it. This still gives me the drive to do it, and keeps a little bit of that fire inside because I love helping our customers, too.”And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.

And for Walker, that’s exactly what he needed.”I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care

“I just build the car and love to go racing,” Walker said. “I don’t want to drive and don’t care to. I would rather put him in it, or if we can rent it, because there’s no more house cars at Fury, that’s fine. If we can go play and have fun, like this one because it all worked out, that’s fine too. We’re all good friends off the track, go out to eat together, hang out, call, whether racing or not. I think the knowledge is what got us there. Without our core guys, sure, it was a fluke win, but with Fultz, Fritz, Mike Darne, Weeder — everyone together put us there.”I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It

“I couldn’t talk,” Walker said in reference to the end of the race. “I stayed up on top of the pit box because we had enough people to change tires and pit the car. It was emotional, and that’s why I sat on the pit box because it wasn’t going to do me any good to work on it. All I did was clean the grille screen. Anything else, I get too nervous because that’s like my baby out there. I have a lot tied up in that car and it has the best of everything you can get, the latest and greatest. Walking down pit road, I don’t think it hit. When he first pulled up, that’s when I started crying. Then, here came everyone, and it was just emotional. I gave it all I had and we kind of put the group of us together, and since we’re all friends on and off the track, I think that’s what meant more to me than anything. It still really hasn’t sunk in. Everyone’s called, texted, emailed, it just hasn’t really sunk in yet. It kinda, sorta has, but not yet.” While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the

While the story is one for storybooks and Hollywood movies, this tale is real. In a sense, Walker is a throwback to old-school car owners who do it for the love of the sport and the comraderie of their buddies. Although he and Fultz have been friends for years, it was an otherwise casual conversation which lit the fire for what has already been a successful partnership.”He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

“He called me up after I sold him some furniture and said, ‘Man, if you wanna go racing, I can put it together.’ It took longer than we wanted it to, but it paid off.”

For more information on Walker Motorsports, visit their website at ChrisWalkerMotorsports.com, follow them on Facebook (@ChrisWalkerMotorsportsInc), Twitter (@CWMTeam), and Instagram (@WalkerMotorsports).

Driver Jeff Fultz can also be found on various social media including Facebook (@JeffFultzRacing), Twitter (@JeffFultz) and Instagram (@JeffFultz).

CARS Response Energy Tour Returns to Dual Division Format at Myrtle Beach with $10,000 on the Line for Super Late Models

Photo: CARS Tour

Mooresville, NC – The 2018 season for the CARS Response Energy Tour kicks into high gear with the season kick-off for the Super Late Model division next weekend March 24th at Myrtle Beach (SC) Speedway. The $10,000 to win Bakerdist.com 200 pres. by Honeywell is expected to draw a hefty car count to the half-mile beachside South Carolina track.

The race will feature 100 green flag laps of racing for both divisions, however; the Super Late Model feature will feature a six-tire strategy element, with a four-minute break for tires and adjustment on lap 70 of 100. While all teams in attendance know that name of the game at Myrtle Beach is tire conservation, the element of the two tire change could really mix things up in the final thirty laps.

A few of the early entries include Raphael Lessard, now driving for Kyle Busch Motorsports. Lessard will compete full time on the tour in hopes of becoming the first driver in CARS history to win two championship titles. Jared Fryar transitions from the Late Model Stock division to the Super Late Models for the 2018 season. The Trinity, NC driver captured a Late Model Stock victory a season ago at Dominion Raceway. Preston Peltier will travel from his home, now located in snowy Colorado, to pilot the #33 Newton Concrete Chevrolet for the Roger Lee Newton owned team. Series newcomer Molly Hulmuth will also travel from “out West”, as she makes her series debut driving for Will Jones in 2018. Ryan Moore is another driver in the fold that comes to the Beach to make his series debut.

In addition to the Super Late Models, the Late Model Stock Cars will be in action as well, getting the tour back to its traditional two premier division format. Bobby McCarty, with his big win at Tri-County, carries all kinds of momentum into the race. However; the early favorite for the 100 lap race has to be JR Motorsports driver Josh Berry. Berry won the 2016 CARS Tour event and did the same last year at the track’s own Myrtle Beach 400 race in November. Several local drivers like Matt Cox will be taking advantage of the Staubli Hometown Hero Awards, receiving free Hoosier tires for competing against the touring stars. The addition of the track regulars can’t be ignored as Sam Yarbrough in 2015, schooled the series regulars at his home track enroot the race win.

Fans planning on making a weekend of it at the Beach can take advantage of free infield camping with purchase of a pit pass. Not camping, but want to watch the race from the infield? A special combo of two general admission tickets and one infield parking pass is also available for $50. For a complete listing of ticket options and prices, as well as the complete event schedule can be found by visit http://www.carsracingtour.com.

 

For additional information on the CARS Response Energy Tout and its Late Model Stock and Super Late Model divisions visit http://www.carsracingtour.com. Be sure to stay active and social with the tour by liking “CARS Tour” on Facebook, following @CARSTour on Twitter, and scrolling through photos on Instagram cars_tour. Additional series information can be obtained by calling the CARS Response Energy Tour series office, located in Mooresville, NC, at 704.662.9212.

Tate Fogleman Dominates Super Late Model Portion of 2017 Thanksgiving Classic

Tate Folgeman celebrates getting out of the car in SNMP victory lane during the 2017 Thanksgiving Classic (Justin Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com)

Lucama, NC – Tate Fogleman had something to prove this weekend at Southern National Motorsports Park in the seventh running of the Thanksgiving Classic. Though he was not the fastest car in single-car qualifying Saturday evening – that honor was bestowed upon Danny O’Quinn Jr. when he was the only driver to cusp the fourteen-second brack.

Folgeman, however, flexed his muscles early and often taking the lead from O’Quinn before the field returned to the start-finish line. He would be tested five different times throughout the race when the field was slowed due to the caution flag. Folgeman was money on every restart and retained his position at the front of the field each time.

Second through well, the rest of the field saw some pretty interesting battles throughout the 125-lap feature. Tim Hollis might have been the biggest mover through the entire event as he started shotgun on the field after failing to lay a lap down in qualifying. He would battle his way up to as high as fourth place during the race but would ultimately fall back to seventh when the checkered flew

Jody Meesmer clearly earned the “Tough Break Award” if there was one. Jody took the green flag in the sixth position and it was an uphill battle from there. Running as high as third during the feature, Meesmer had possible engine/carb issues that brought out the afternoons first caution. He would later make contact with Bronson Butcher that caused pretty substantial cosmetic damage. He would later bring out another caution, indirectly of course, due to debris falling off his car.

No one would have anything for Folgeman in the closing laps and he would go on to take home the hardware.

Photo: Justin Kern/TheWeeklyRacer.com

Super Late Model Results

  1. #8 Tate Folgeman; 125
  2. #16r Bronson Butcher; 125
  3. #7 Taylor Stricklin; 125
  4. #16 Lucas Jones; 125
  5. #2 Darrell Gilchrist; 125
  6. #96 Danny O’Quinn Jr.; 125
  7. #22 Tim Hollis; 125
  8. #98 Jody Meesmer; 78

Cole Rouse, Josh Berry Winners Durings CARS Tour Race to Remeber 250

CONCORD, NC – During a night dedicated to the memory of fallen soldiers and first responders from the region, Cole Rouse and Josh Berry were remembered by departing fans as winners during the Race To Remember 250 at Concord Speedway on Saturday night. Both drivers improved their championship hopes with the victories with one race remaining in the series schedule.

 

SUPER LATE MODEL

Preston Peltier stole the Mahle Pistons Pole Award with his last-minute qualifying effort during Fivestar Bodies Knockout Qualifying, earning him the right to lead the field to the green flag. He set the pace for only two circuits until Cole Rouse took over the point and led from lap 3 until lap 36.

On a lap 37 restart, former series champion Cole Timm snagged the point from fellow Toyota driver Rouse but he also was only there for a short time until Rouse retook the top spot on lap 43.

A caution for debris on lap 79 set up a restart with Peltier, who had been stalking Rouse most of the race, alongside of the No. 51 as the field came to green. A former winner at Concord throughout the years in various sanctions, Peltier motored his way around Rouse two laps after the restart, visibly using more than others had in order to keep the point.

Tyler Ankrum’s car lost a hub on lap 93 and pounded the turn two wall, an accident which allowed Rouse another shot at Peltier on the restart. Sideways and using more track than Rouse, Peltier was able to hold the point until the waning laps of the event when Rouse began to up the pressure on the No. 33 of Peltier.

The pair dueled side-by-side for a handful of laps before Rouse used the bumper to move Peltier, skating through to take the lead with only five laps to go. He proceeded to pull away to his second career series win, a victory which vaulted him from second into the top spot in the point standings going into the South Boston finale on October 14.

Peltier, Christian Eckes, Matt Wallace and Matt Craig rounded out the top five finishers in one of the most competitive super late model races the tour has seen at Concord’s half-mile layout.

“What was going through my head was that it was going to be the last lap when, if I wasn’t already past him, I was just going to have to hit him and move him,” Rouse admitted in victory lane. “I had to do it for these guys, we’ve had so many taken away from us this year, so I’m really happy for these guys and that we could get it done today.

“He started to fall off a bit, so once I got past him I wasn’t really worried since we were about 10 car lengths past him,” he continued when asked about the move to get the lead and its championship implications. “South Boston wasn’t on our schedule, but we’re going to have to make it part of our schedule now. We’ll be happy to get there, and it’ll be a new racetrack.”

 

LATE MODEL STOCK CAR

The final box score of the late model stock car feature may make the race look tame, but from the moments prior to the green flag, it was anything but calm.

Deac McCaskill captured his ninth career Hedgecock Racing Pole Award, moving his series-leading record ahead by another mark. Following qualifying, however, McCaskill and team discovered a leaking tire on his machine, forcing the team to change it and placing him to the rear of the field by series rules.

By virtue of his cousin’s misfortune, Bradley McCaskill led the field to green alongside of Josh Berry. Both former winners at Concord, McCaskill shot out to the early race lead and set the pace until a lap 54 caution for a spin immediately in front of him in turn two.

Berry gave McCaskill fits on the ensuing restart, ultimately passing the No. 07 car for the lead on lap 58 after a side-by-side fight in front of the healthy crowd at Concord. Berry’s teammate and championship rival Anthony Alfredo was involved in an incident in turn one which brought out the second caution in a rash of yellow fever on lap 69, setting up another restart with McCaskill beside Berry.

Josh Berry kept the lead on the restart, but two laps later McCaskill and Justin Carroll made contact entering turn three, sending McCaskill for a spin which ultimately collected a number of other cars and appeared to eliminate the No. 07 from the event after hard contact by Evan Swilling squarely on the rear end. Miraculously, McCaskill was able to continue while Swilling was finished for the night.

After five additional cautions between laps 76 and 113, the race came down to a 12-lap shootout with Berry leading and young Brandon Grosso, with Deac McCaskill and others immediately behind. Exercising his veteran prowess, Berry executed another flawless restart to assert himself as the dominant car.

The JR Motorsports driver cruised to his 12th career series win by 1.018 seconds over Grosso, McCaskill, Tommy Lemons and Cody Haskins. The victory allowed Berry to bypass teammate Alfredo in the standings and close to within single digits of Layne Riggs entering the season finale on October 14 at South Boston Speedway.

“It’s so tough, I can’t put it into words how tough it is on those restarts and you see it on Sunday,” Berry admitted after the race in Edelbrock Victory Lane. “Nine out of ten restarts you can be perfect, but the one that you don’t is the one that everyone remembers you for, so I was just trying to be perfect and do my job. We had a great racecar. I wasn’t sure how good we were going to be, but it obviously paid off. Deac had trouble before the race, and I know he would’ve been tough to beat, but that’s how it goes.

“He’s young and hungry, and I’ve been in that situation, so at that point whatever would’ve happened, I wouldn’t have been surprised,” he continued when asked about Brandon Grosso and his career-best run immediately behind him. “He raced me clean and raced me hard, but he’s improved a lot over the season and his day is coming, for sure.”

While the race win was the story of the night, Berry and the JR Motorsports team were already thinking down the road.

“Last week at Hickory wasn’t good for us in the point situation, but I’m not going to go down without a fight,” he reiterated to those in attendance. “We’re going to keep after it, we’re going to work hard, and we’re going to be ready at South Boston. South Boston is a wild card. I haven’t raced there since it’s been repaved, but I have won there on the old pavement. It’s going to be a totally different animal. We proved tonight we’re not going away and those guys are going to have to run good to beat us because we’re going to be up front.”

The CARS Tour visits South Boston Speedway on October 14 for the series finale, the first time the tour has visited the facility. Located just north of Orange County Speedway, the recently repaved .400-mile oval will host both divisions in the SoBo 250 in six weeks’ time.

For more information on the CARS Tour, visit their website at http://www.carsracingtour.com. Fresh content and updates can also be found on the series Facebook page (@carstour), Twitter (@carstour), Instagram (@cars_tour), Snapchat (@carstour) and Youtube channel (/carstour). The series Roku app is also available for installation to see live and on-demand events by following the instructions available at http://www.carstour.tv.

 

NOTES OF INTEREST:

– Justin Carroll was a contender for the win in the late model stock car race, but had misfortune fall his way while racing in the lead pack. Contact with Bradley McCaskill earned him the privilege of a HANS throw from Bradley McCaskill, a toss which landed on the right side door of the No. 57 car. Perhaps unrelated, Carroll was forced to pit road a few laps later with a loose exhaust pipe as it hung outside the passenger-side door of his Ford, a problem which ultimately eliminated him from contention.

– Championship contender Anthony Alfredo was involved in a crash with Jared Fryar on lap 92, an incident which eliminated both drivers from the race. Alfredo suffered the worst fate in the championship fight, losing nine points to Layne Riggs by virtue of his 17th place finish.

– At the beginning of the season, super late model winner Cole Rouse had full intentions of running twelve super late model races with Kyle Busch Motorsports, presumably with the CARS Tour. As the season wore on, the team changed their approach slightly, but Rouse found two one-off races with owners mid-season to continue his pursuit of the title, a move which has proven to be beneficial entering the season finale. Before Saturday, South Boston was not on the team’s schedule, but given the circumstances in which they enter that event, it’s extremely likely that Kyle Busch Motorsports will field a No. 51 Toyota for Rouse at South Boston in pursuit of their first series championship.

– Dozens of fallen military heroes and veterans, along with first responders, were honored by teams and the CARS Tour during the event. Each car carried the name of someone who paid the ultimate price for their country in addition to various branches of service and charity organizations. In an emotional pre-race moment, late model stock polesitter Deac McCaskill was given the dogtags of his soldier from a family member to carry with him during the Race To Remember 250.

 

THE FINISHES:

CARS Super Late Model Tour
Race To Remember 250
Concord Speedway – August 26, 2017

POS NUM DRIVER LAPS REASON OUT
1. 51 Cole Rouse 125
2. 33 Preston Peltier 125
3. 15 Christian Eckes 125
4. 6 Matt Wallace 125
5. 54 Matt Craig 125
6. 34 Nolan Pope 125
7. 87 Matt Thomas 125
8. 4 Brandon Setzer 125
9. 49 Jeff Batten 125
10. 58 Tyler Ankrum 93 Accident
11. 57 Cole Timm 86 Mechanical
12. 37 Dan Speeney 79 Mechanical
13. 7 Tyler Church 43 Mechanical

 

CARS Late Model Stock Tour
Race To Remember 250
Concord Speedway – August 26, 2017

POS NUM DRIVER LAPS REASON OUT
1. 88b Josh Berry 125
2. 32 Brandon Grosso 125
3. 08 Deac McCaskill 125
4. 27 Tommy Lemons, Jr. 125
5. 2 Cody Haskins 125
6. 12m Austin McDaniel 125
7. 24 Craig Stallard 125
8. 99 Layne Riggs 125
9. 23 Terry Brooks, Jr. 125
10. 14 Ryan Repko 121
11. 07 Bradley McCaskill 116 Mechanical
12. 18g Ty Gibbs 111 Accident
13. 88 Chris Davis 111 Accident
14. 74 Ronald Hill 93 Accident
15. 12g Andrew Garcia 93 Accident
16. 81 Jared Fryar 92 Accident
17. 8 Anthony Alfredo 92 Accident
18. 28 Chris Hudspeth 89 Accident

19. 57 Justin Carroll 76 Mechanical
20. 18 Evan Swilling 71 Accident
21. 96 Danny O’Quinn, Jr. 70 Mechanical

SAM ARD, DICK TRICKLE VISIT VICTORY LANE AT HICKORY IN THROWBACK 276 WITH FOGLEMAN & CARROLL

Photo: Kyle Tretow / CARS Tour

NEWTON, NC – Though both legends of the sport have since passed on to the great racetrack in the sky, Sam Ard and Dick Trickle visited victory lane for presumably the final time on Saturday night during the CARS Tour Throwback 276 at Hickory Motor Speedway. Racing cars with the same schemes as the the legends, Tate Fogleman (Ard) won his first career super late model race while Justin Carroll (Trickle) thrilled the near-capacity crowd en route to his first career series win.

Matt Craig blistered the Hickory layout for another Mahle Pistons Pole Award to start the surreal Saturday at Hickory. Appropriately, his family has been around the sport for decades with drivers like Clay Rogers and Jeff Fultz, and it appeared Craig was channeling their skills during most of the 138-lap contest racing toward an apparent victory.

The racing gods, however, had different ideas during the caution-free event. Fogleman took advantage of a break in traffic and a fading handle on the No. 54 car to move the No. 00 Thomas Brothers Country Ham Ford to the lead on lap 113. Craig attempted to move the Fogleman ride up the track two corners later but failed in his attempt, eventually falling 5 seconds behind Fogleman in the final 26 laps.

For the first, and likely the final, time in history, the Sam Ard No. 00 cruised the Edelbrock Victory Lane at Hickory Motor Speedway, a track which was vital to Ard’s success in the NASCAR Xfinity Series’ early years. Appropriately, it was a Fogleman who drove it there. Tate’s father, Jay Fogleman, worked and drove for Sam Ard once his driving career concluded, making victory lane very bittersweet.

“I know we got strung out there, and we got caught in lapped traffic,” Fogleman said after the race. “I was thinking back to the last race when got together with Lessard and was kinda thinking we were impatient then, so I tried to wait and plan the right move. When I got around him, I was praying. I didn’t want a caution to come out, that was the last thing I wanted to see. I can’t thank Solid Rock Carriers enough for letting us run this car, it’s unbelievable to take Sam Ard to victory lane. It’s a guy my dad looked up to, and with the stories he has told me, he became someone I looked up to, as well. It’s just unbelievable, I don’t know what to say.”

A short track legend in his own right, Tate’s father Jay was overcome with emotion.

“Sam did a lot for me. If it wasn’t for him, I would’ve never driven what was a Busch car back then. He just gave a broke kid a chance, and I worked for Sam, and…” the elder Fogleman trailed off while visibly fighting back tears. “It’s…. a good deal”

Matt Craig held on for second over Brandon Setzer, Bubba Pollard, and Tyler Ankrum, the only five cars on the lead lap.

 

The late model stock field was filled with throwback schemes on nearly every car, making their portion of the Throwback 276 exceptionally special for fans and racers alike.

The “Flying 11” of Layne Riggs captured the Hedgecock Pole and led the opening laps despite a handful of early cautions, one of which eliminated Stefan Parsons’ and Craig Moore’s throwback rides when they collided after sliding in oil laid down by Ty Gibbs’ car when its engine erupted in smoke in turn three.

Riggs continued to show the way through lap 58 when Justin Carroll, who made four total practice laps on Saturday afternoon, worked his way around Riggs for his first lead of the night.Carroll was up front when the largest incident of the night occurred. Second place driver Ryan Repko failed to come up to speed initially on a lap 94 restart and caused a chain reaction which severely damaged the cars of pre-race favorite Josh Berry, Jared Fryar, Riggs, Brandon Grosso and others.

Carroll was up front when the largest incident of the night occurred. Second place driver Ryan Repko failed to come up to speed initially on a lap 94 restart and caused a chain reaction which severely damaged the cars of pre-race favorite Josh Berry, Jared Fryar, Riggs, Brandon Grosso and others.A subsequent slip by Carroll on a lap 98 restart allowed Austin McDaniel, running a gold Bobby Allison throwback scheme, to take the lead for the first time of the night. McDaniel fought off multiple charges from Carroll as the laps began to wind down, but a caution on lap 111 set the stage for one of the most epic races in the history of Hickory Motor Speedway.

A subsequent slip by Carroll on a lap 98 restart allowed Austin McDaniel, running a gold Bobby Allison throwback scheme, to take the lead for the first time of the night. McDaniel fought off multiple charges from Carroll as the laps began to wind down, but a caution on lap 111 set the stage for one of the most epic races in the history of Hickory Motor Speedway.Over the course of the final 27 laps, Carroll, McDaniel and Anthony Alfredo waged a three-wide battle for the race lead where multiple

Over the course of the final 27 laps, Carroll, McDaniel and Anthony Alfredo waged a three-wide battle for the race lead where multiple instance of bumper tag were initiated, the trio found themselves three-wide for the race lead, and on more than one occasion sparks flew from the competitors involved. The near-capacity crowd at Hickory rose to its feet as the leaders bumped, banged and fought to take home the trophy. McDaniel finally bounced off the turn two wall with less than five laps to go, allowing Carroll the go-ahead to his first CARS Tour victory.

Carroll, driving the Dick Trickle/Junie Donlavey tribute, captured his first series win at the same track where the “White Knight” Trickle captured his first NASCAR Xfinity Series triumph.“You have no idea, oh my gosh, I think that was Dick driving because I don’t know if Justin Carroll was in that racecar, but Dick was definitely with me,” Carroll admitted in a tone of disbelief in victory lane. “He won over 1000 short track races, and I’m not sure if I want to take the ’90’ off the car now, but we had such an awesome car today. Yesterday, we didn’t even practice, but we knew we had a good car. I can’t thank that guy over there, Jason Stanley, enough because we’ve worked really hard on this car and we’ve been

“You have no idea, oh my gosh, I think that was Dick driving because I don’t know if Justin Carroll was in that racecar, but Dick was definitely with me,” Carroll admitted in a tone of disbelief in victory lane. “He won over 1000 short track races, and I’m not sure if I want to take the ’90’ off the car now, but we had such an awesome car today. Yesterday, we didn’t even practice, but we knew we had a good car. I can’t thank that guy over there, Jason Stanley, enough because we’ve worked really hard on this car and we’ve been really, really good and really fast everywhere we go. To finally get a CARS Tour win, in a crazy race like that, I don’t think the fans could get any better of a show than that. That was the best racing I’ve ever been a part of, and if I was a fan, that’d be one of the best races I’ve ever seen.

know, because the pressure was really getting to me racing against Austin McDaniel and Anthony Alfredo who won both the twins here earlier in the year. This is awesome.”

Alfredo, McDaniel, Brandon Grosso in a Dale Jarrett throwback, and Ryan Repko rounded out the top five finishers. 18 of the 23 late model stock starters honored a team, owner, driver or other portion of racing history with their paint schemes.

The CARS Tour visits Concord Speedway for the Race to Remember 250 on August 26, the penultimate race of the series’ third season. A pre-race concert highlights the day at 6pm with racing scheduled to begin at 8 pm.

For more information on the CARS Tour, visit their website at www.carsracingtour.com. Fresh content and updates can also be found on the series Facebook page (@carstour), Twitter (@carstour), Instagram (@cars_tour), Snapchat (@carstour) and Youtube channel (/carstour). The series Roku app is also available for installation to see live and on-demand events by following the instructions available at www.carstour.tv.

 

NOTES OF INTEREST:

-25 teams started the event with throwback paint schemes on their cars. Two others were unable to make the event for various reasons but had also committed to throwback schemes on their machines.

-The Landon Huffman team took home an extra $250 for the “Best Appearing Crew” award with his father’s former Goody’s Dash Series crew uniforms, hats, and more. They were followed closely by the Kyle Beattie Racing team who donned full 1960s style, bright white uniforms, slicked back hair and matching shoes to go with the Ned Jarrett scheme on their No. 11 Ford.

-Anthony Alfredo, who entered the race five points out of the lead and tied with his JR Motorsports teammate Josh Berry for second in the series standings, unofficially took over the late model stock points lead by three over Layne Riggs.

-With his misfortunate mid-race, Cole Rouse also found himself on the wrong side of the points battle entering the final two races. The Kyle Busch Motorsports driver entered the Throwback 276 only 13 points ahead of Brandon Setzer but a mechanical failure on his Toyota relegated him to an 18th place finish, allowing Setzer to re-take the lead in the standings by a scant two points.

-Most fans were curious why the event was an oddly-numbered 276 laps. The reason is simple. The last Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series race run at Hickory, won by Tiny Lund, ran 276 laps, a distance of 100 miles around the .363-mile layout.

 

 

THE FINISHES:

CARS Super Late Model Tour
Throwback 276
Hickory Motor Speedway – August 5, 2017

POS        NUM     DRIVER LAPS      REASON OUT
1.            00           Tate Fogleman  138
2.            54           Matt Craig           138
3.            4              Brandon Setzer 138
4.            26           Bubba Pollard    138
5.            58           Tyler Ankrum     138
6.            7              Tyler Church       137
7.            33           Bradley McCaskill  137
8.            49           Jeff Batten          137
9.            6              Matt Wallace     137
10.          17           Mike Speeney   137
11.          34           Nolan Pope        137
12.          88           Garrett Jones     137
13.          87           Matt Thomas     137
14.          55           Hailie Deegan    136
15.          21           Riley Thornton  136
16.          57           Cole Timm           136
17.          11           Roy Hayes III      135
18.          51           Cole Rouse         97  Mechanical
19.          99           John Gustafson 42    Parked

 

 

CARS Late Model Stock Tour
Throwback 276
Hickory Motor Speedway – August 5, 2017

POS        NUM     DRIVER LAPS      REASON OUT
1.            90           Justin Carroll          138
2.            8              Anthony Alfredo     138
3.            12           Austin McDaniel      138
4.            32           Brandon Grosso      138
5.            14           Ryan Repko            138
6.            1              Dexter Canipe, Jr.  138
7.            96           Danny O’Quinn, Jr.   138
8.            2              Cody Haskins         138
9.            37           Landon Huffman      138
10.          11R         Layne Riggs             138
11.          3              Deac McCaskill       138
12.          07           Ronald Hill              138
13.          44           Jared Fryar              138
14.          28           Chris Hudspeth        138
15.          4            Annabeth Barnes-Crum 138
16.          38           Josh Berry               136
17.          82           Justin Johnson          111         Mechanical
18.          27           Tommy Lemons, Jr.    90           Mechanical
19.          11G        Ty Gibbs                    27           Engine
20.          55           Stefan Parsons          27           Accident
21.          18           Evan Swilling             27           Accident
22.          22           Craig Moore              27           Accident
23.          51           Robert Tyler              20           Mechanical

Matt Craig Dominates for PASS Victory at Southern National

LUCAMA, NC – Matt Craig took the lead from Matt Wallace on lap 28 of Saturday night’s 150 lap PASS South Super Late Model race and never looked back, as he scored his second Southern National win of the year in dominant fashion.

Craig, who has enjoyed plenty of success at Southern National with two wins in the Pro Late Model Series last year along with a PASS South win earlier this year, performed a sweep of the PASS South Series with his victory on Saturday.

“That’s really cool to sweep the season in PASS, both races,” Craig said after the race.  “The car has just been phenomenal.  We have a good setup under our piece right now and I think it was a good race.  I wish we had a few more cautions there, got strung and my car kept getting a little better and some other ones were fading.  It was a lot of fun.  I love this track a whole bunch and hope we come back here next year.”

Early in the race, Matt Wallace pulled away with a big lead, until the caution came out for rain, erasing Craig’s deficit to Wallace.  Craig, who had been saving tires, was able to get by and then pull away.  He would go on to survive a series of late race restarts to pick up the win, his fourth win of the season in PASS South competition.

“We were just letting off at the flagstand,” Craig explained.  “He was running a little hard and I’ve done it before.  It takes a while to learn your lesson about that.  With five to go, I wasn’t real worried.  My crew was giving me the lap times and we felt safe.”

Maine driver Dave Farrington finished the race in second while fellow northern driver Trevor Sanborn was third.  Rounding out the top-five were Jared Fryar and veteran Jay Fogleman.

Gary Ledbetter, Jr. dominated in the 50 lap Mid-Atlantic Street Stock feature race to score the victory in convincing fashion.  Much like Craig had to do in the Super Late Model race, Ledbetter survived a series of late race restarts and held on for the victory.

“You try to save as much tire as you can for cautions at the end if you have any,” Ledbetter said.  “We saved enough where it helped out and worked out for us.  I knew the car was good, but a restart worries you.  Bobby [Templeton] ran me clean.  He’s a good driver.  Still, you never know, five to go, sometimes people are hungrier than others.”

Tumbleton finished in second while Ricky Locklair, Jr. finished third, Sonny Schoffen was fourth and Jeff Melton finished fifth.

Southern National Motorsports Park resumes its regular season on Friday night, August 4th with the #StottStrong195 presented by Solid Rock Carriers out of LaGrange, North Carolina, headlined by twin Late Model Stock Car races.  Chargers, Mini Stocks, Legends, Bandoleros and Any Cars will also be in action in a memorial race for Ashley Stott, a longtime supporter of Southern National Motorsports Park.

For more information about Southern National Motorsports Park, check out SNMP’s website at www.snmpark.com“like” Southern National Motorsports Park on Facebook or “follow” @SNM_Park on Twitter.

Unofficial Results

PASS Super Late Model

1.    Matt Craig

2.    Dave Farrington

3.    Trevor Sanborn

4.    Jared Fryar

5.    Jay Fogleman

6.    Joe Graf, Jr.

7.    Kodie Conner

8.    Tate Foleman

9.    Sarah Cornett-Ching

10.  Matt Wallace

11.  Roy Hayes, III

12.  Eddie Fatscher

13.  Jody Measamer

14.  Will Bristle

MASS Street Stock

1.    Gary Ledbetter, Jr.

2.    Bobby Tumbleton, III

3.    Ricky Locklair, Jr.

4.    Sonny Schoffen

5.    Jeff Melton

6.    Gary Ledbetter, Sr.

7.    Kevin Ellis

8.    David Thomas

9.    Kevin Benton

10.  Wayne Locklair

11.  Greg Barnette

12.  Chuck Ison

13.  Wesley Scott

14.  Michael Worthington

15.  James Horner, Jr.

16.  Ron Flynn

17.  Kyle Lynch

18.  Ricky Locklair, Sr.

19.  Anthony Yarborough

20.  Larry Isenhower

Big Money Ahead for CARS Tour in Inaugural “Mid Atlantic Classic” at Orange County Speedway

Photo: CARS Tour Website

The 2017 Puryear Tank Lines/Thrifty Tire Service Centers 300 at Orange County Speedway saw Kyle Busch Motorsports development driver Cole Rouse hold off Matt Craig to claim his first career victory in CARS Super Late Model competition. Local favorite Layne Riggs led wire to wire in the Late Model Stock Car Tour event en route to a popular victory in front of his home crowd.

Riggs’ victory allowed him to slightly extend his points lead over Anthony Alfredo in the LMSC Tour, while Rouse was able to tie Brandon Setzer for the points lead in the SLM Tour. However, when the CARS Tour competitors return to Orange County, there will be more than just points on the line.

The historic, 3/8 mile asphalt oval will play host to the inaugural Mid-Atlantic Classic on July 22, 2017. The 150-lap super late model event will feature several key differences from the previous outing at Orange County for the super late models, including a total purse of $50,875, in which every competitor who makes the 30-car starting grid will earn $1,000. The winner of the Mid-Atlantic Classic will receive $10,000, which is a paycheck that exceeds every previous event in CARS Tour history, including the U.S. Nationals at Bristol that saw race winner Darrell Wallace Jr. earned $7,500.

“We are so excited to be able to bring the best Super Late Model drivers in the country to Orange County Speedway,” said CARS Tour Director of Marketing and Operations Chris Ragle. “Each race at Orange County has gotten bigger than the previous, now with $10,000 to win and $1000 to start we have seen interest beyond our expectations.  It is going to be a great show that you won’t want to miss!”

The Mid-Atlantic Classic will also mark the first time that stage race is used in the CARS Tour. The super late model race will be divided into four segments consisting of 35 laps, 65 laps, another 35 laps and a 15-lap sprint to the finish to end the race. There will be a five-minute break to accompany the end of each stage, and all segment winners will earn a $500 cash bonus, and will start inside the Top 8 for the final stage.

Stage racing has been around in many forms in auto racing over the past several decades, including exhibition NASCAR races such as the All-Star Race and The Clash, as well as the Eldora Dirt Derby in the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series. However, 2017 is the first year in which stage racing has been utilized throughout the entire NASCAR season, as the Top 10 drivers in each stage receive points, and stage winners in the top three NASCAR series earn a playoff point for their respective Chase. The new format has been well received by drivers and fans in NASCAR, and many CARS Tour competitors believe that stage racing will have many benefits for the series.

“Stage racing is going to be very fan-friendly,” said CARS Super Late Model competitor Bradley McCaskill. “The format is going to give fans something to watch, instead of drivers just riding around and saving tires until the end. It’s kind of cool how the series is giving drivers an incentive to go hard and get track position for later in the race.”

Each segment break will allow teams to change tires and work on their cars. After each break concludes, drivers will line up based on how many tires they changed in the pit box, with drivers who changed no tires starting first, while drivers who changed all four tires will start in the rear of the field. This will only be the second time this season that teams have had the option to make adjustments to their cars during the race, and many of the drivers believe that pit strategy will determine the outcome of the race.

“Everybody is going to want tires, especially as the race gets closer to the end,” said three-time CARS SLM Tour winner Matt Craig. “However, if you can get track position early and get that first stage win, then that will help your starting position. There is a lot to think about, but I think it is going to be a really interesting event, and I think you’ll see some newcomers show up. Pit strategy is really going to help out the guys who normally don’t have a shot to win the race.”

A strong field of super late model teams is expected for the Mid-Atlantic Classic, including CARS SLM Tour points leader Brandon Setzer, Raphael Lessard, Bubba Pollard, Jared Irvan, and local driver Tate Fogleman just to name a few. Although there will not be a $10,000 paycheck or any stage racing for the CARS LMSC Tour, the Mid-Atlantic Classic will serve as another chapter in the close points battle between Layne Riggs, Anthony Alfredo and Josh Berry. Nine points only separate them, but the JR Motorsports teammates of Berry and Alfredo will have to find a way to prevent Riggs from obtaining another win at his home track if they hope to gain an advantage over him.

For more information on the CARS Tour, visit their website at carsracingtour.com. Fresh content and updates can also be found on the series Facebook page (@carstour), Twitter (@carstour), Instagram (@cars_tour), Snapchat (@carstour) and YouTube channel (/carstour). The series Roku app is also available for installation to see live and on-demand events by following the instructions available at www.carstour.tv.

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